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Thread: Shaft weight

  1. #1

    Shaft weight

    I am thinking of trying a 50 gram shaft for my driver. I am hesitant because the great majority of OEM and after market shafts are in the 60 to 70 gram range. My question is this:
    If there is such a benefit to going light, why don't more folks use them?
    I understand the physics of e = mass x velocity(squared). So increasing swing speed has an exponential effect. I get that. What I don't understand is why the norm is about 65 grams.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by NC chili dipper
    I am thinking of trying a 50 gram shaft for my driver. I am hesitant because the great majority of OEM and after market shafts are in the 60 to 70 gram range. My question is this:
    If there is such a benefit to going light, why don't more folks use them?
    I understand the physics of e = mass x velocity(squared). So increasing swing speed has an exponential effect. I get that. What I don't understand is why the norm is about 65 grams.
    Ya I was going to bring up that e=mass x velocity thing I mean duh! You hafta be a MOE-RON ta not git that! Geeeeeez! And that exponinshal aphekt thing too. Yup.....
    team obnoxious
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    Quote Originally Posted by NC chili dipper
    I am thinking of trying a 50 gram shaft for my driver. I am hesitant because the great majority of OEM and after market shafts are in the 60 to 70 gram range. My question is this:
    If there is such a benefit to going light, why don't more folks use them?
    I understand the physics of e = mass x velocity(squared). So increasing swing speed has an exponential effect. I get that. What I don't understand is why the norm is about 65 grams.
    IMO, in term of physic lighter shaft would translate into more club head speed which MAY translate into a 5-10 yds more, however, if you have a fast SS I guess 50g but stiff instead of R-flex would work better (i.e, one notch stiffer than what you would normally play)... Again, it's just an educated guess

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    Believe me, it doesn't work that way. Not at all. Why doesn't Tiger use lighter shaft ? It's about what shaft your body is comfortable with; in terms of flex and weight. So, test as many shaft as possible especially during demo days.

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    Quote Originally Posted by NC chili dipper
    I am thinking of trying a 50 gram shaft for my driver. I am hesitant because the great majority of OEM and after market shafts are in the 60 to 70 gram range. My question is this:
    If there is such a benefit to going light, why don't more folks use them?
    I understand the physics of e = mass x velocity(squared). So increasing swing speed has an exponential effect. I get that. What I don't understand is why the norm is about 65 grams.
    Enjoy the Senior League at your local golf club. I hope you can get Geritol to sponsor your annual Club Championship.
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by NC chili dipper
    I am thinking of trying a 50 gram shaft for my driver. I am hesitant because the great majority of OEM and after market shafts are in the 60 to 70 gram range. My question is this:
    If there is such a benefit to going light, why don't more folks use them?
    I understand the physics of e = mass x velocity(squared). So increasing swing speed has an exponential effect. I get that. What I don't understand is why the norm is about 65 grams.

    Most healthy, athletic males are able to swing a 65g shaft at their maximum potential velocity already, and only the older and weaker players tend to improve their swing speeds with lighter shafts than this.

    Most of the better players who can easily manage a 65g shaft will tend towards heavier shafts, due to the increased benefit a heavier shaft provides to tempo and rhythm - making a more consistent swing more "automatic", because inertia does a lot of the desirable things in a golf swing for you.

    Better to be a few yards shorter and in the fairway than a few yards longer and in the rhubarb.



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    I'm confused again. I thought we all agreed that shaft weight and flex was irrelevant, as centrifugal force is what creates clubhead speed. Don't you idiots know that a shaft doesn't even bend during the swing. Trevino could beat anyone on this board with a coke bottle tied to a stick. All you need is the whippy tempo master, then get any shaft you want.
    The views expressed by Not a Hacker are not meant to be understood by you primitive screw heads. Don't take it personally, just sit back and enjoy the writings of your better.

  8. #8
    There are only a couple proven advantages of using a 55 or less shaft that we've seen.

    1) It allows people to use longer length drivers without altering the static and/or swing weight much.
    2) Some people like the feel of the altered swing weight it offers.

    But as far as replacing a 65gm for a 55gm to increase swing speed? We haven't seen it.

    Actually, we've found many of the 55gm shafts have been counterproductive to those with a slower swing speed because many manufacturers, when offering sub 60gm shafts have increased the tip stiffness...in many cases stiffer than their >60 gm models.

    Usually, when someone has a slower speed,and wants to regain some lost distance, we go to a shorter overall club length (usually, they're hitting something too long for them anyway) and softer flex.

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