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Thread: Recipes

  1. #1
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    Recipes

    I'm looking for some new recipes...non-grilling of course (Spank has that section covered).

    I'll give one that the whole family enjoys (including the 2 yr old)

    Mexican Casserole - Chicken

    Ingredients:
    1 1/2 lbs of chicken breast
    Pack of soft tortilla shells (8" or 10")
    1 can of enchilada sauce (15 oz)
    1 can of cream of corn (15 oz)
    1 can of refried beans (15 oz)
    1 can of diced tomatos (15 oz) preferably with green chili peppers
    2 to 4 cups of shredded cheese (chedder or whatever)
    4 ounces of olives

    Directions:
    -Preheat oven 350
    -Boil chicken until cooked thoroughly (15 min or so)...then pull and shred finely with a fork
    -Mix shredded chix, cream of corn, refried beans, tomatoes, olives, and 1/3 or enchilada sauce together in a large bowl (can add some onions, mushrooms, a little chili powder, or whatever else you want)
    -Cover bottom of 13 x 9 dish with 1" strips of tortilla shells, add 1/2 of bowl mixture and lightly cover with cheese, add another layer of 1" tortilla strips, add the rest of bowl mixture, add final layer of tortilla strips, cover top level of strips with rest of enchilada sauce and rest of cheese
    -Cook about 20 to 25 minutes
    The views expressed by The Purist do not necessarily represent the views of The Purist. Any posts by the Purist should not be relied upon for truth or accuracy, and should be viewed at your own risk.

  2. #2
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    Very insightful, TP. All this time I though a Mexican casserole required real Mexicans.
    GR lives...

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    Quote Originally Posted by lorenzoinoc
    Very insightful, TP. All this time I though a Mexican casserole required real Mexicans.
    Glad I could inform you...I put the Olives in for you. I am looking forward to your contribution.
    The views expressed by The Purist do not necessarily represent the views of The Purist. Any posts by the Purist should not be relied upon for truth or accuracy, and should be viewed at your own risk.

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    Quote Originally Posted by The Purist
    Glad I could inform you...I put the Olives in for you. I am looking forward to your contribution.
    I'm not going to go with one of my signature dishes as they're proprietary and prepared to taste so I wouldn't be able to describe amounts.

    I'll probably go with my Osso Buco recipe, but will need more time to set it out, it's kind of involved. To stimulate curiosity and enthusiasm, I'll include this photo of the highest quality key ingredient.

    Aren't those beautiful? Sorry, NAH.



    [IMG]file:///Users/lorenzoscott/Library/Caches/TemporaryItems/moz-screenshot.png[/IMG][IMG]file:///Users/lorenzoscott/Library/Caches/TemporaryItems/moz-screenshot-1.png[/IMG]
    GR lives...

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by lorenzoinoc
    I'm not going to go with one of my signature dishes as they're proprietary and prepared to taste so I wouldn't be able to describe amounts.

    I'll probably go with my Osso Buco recipe, but will need more time to set it out, it's kind of involved. To stimulate curiosity and enthusiasm, I'll include this photo of the highest quality key ingredient.

    Aren't those beautiful? Sorry, NAH.



    [IMG]file:///Users/lorenzoscott/Library/Caches/TemporaryItems/moz-screenshot.png[/IMG][IMG]file:///Users/lorenzoscott/Library/Caches/TemporaryItems/moz-screenshot-1.png[/IMG]
    Yes they are beautiful.

    Screw NAH!
    I chose the road less traveled.

    Now where the f#ck am I?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kiwi Player
    Yes they are beautiful.

    Screw NAH!
    Mmmm, raw tasteless flesh, unaccompanied by all the plant based stuff that actually gives it any taste. Makes you want to just run in to a butcher shop and take in the smells. Remind you of an old fuk huh Kiwi? For the edification of others New Zealanders are known in Australia as sheep shaggers.

    P.S. No offense taken Zoe, just some friendly Trans Tasman trash talking.
    Last edited by Not a hacker; 02-24-2011 at 04:57 AM.
    The views expressed by Not a Hacker are not meant to be understood by you primitive screw heads. Don't take it personally, just sit back and enjoy the writings of your better.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Purist
    I'm looking for some new recipes...non-grilling of course (Spank has that section covered).

    I'll give one that the whole family enjoys (including the 2 yr old)

    Mexican Casserole - Chicken

    Ingredients:
    1 1/2 lbs of chicken breast
    Pack of soft tortilla shells (8" or 10")
    1 can of enchilada sauce (15 oz)
    1 can of cream of corn (15 oz)
    1 can of refried beans (15 oz)
    1 can of diced tomatos (15 oz) preferably with green chili peppers
    2 to 4 cups of shredded cheese (chedder or whatever)
    4 ounces of olives

    Directions:
    -Preheat oven 350
    -Boil chicken until cooked thoroughly (15 min or so)...then pull and shred finely with a fork
    -Mix shredded chix, cream of corn, refried beans, tomatoes, olives, and 1/3 or enchilada sauce together in a large bowl (can add some onions, mushrooms, a little chili powder, or whatever else you want)
    -Cover bottom of 13 x 9 dish with 1" strips of tortilla shells, add 1/2 of bowl mixture and lightly cover with cheese, add another layer of 1" tortilla strips, add the rest of bowl mixture, add final layer of tortilla strips, cover top level of strips with rest of enchilada sauce and rest of cheese
    -Cook about 20 to 25 minutes
    Is there any discernible dfferece between Mexican casserole and Wet Back casserole?
    The views expressed by Not a Hacker are not meant to be understood by you primitive screw heads. Don't take it personally, just sit back and enjoy the writings of your better.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by lorenzoinoc
    I'm not going to go with one of my signature dishes as they're proprietary and prepared to taste so I wouldn't be able to describe amounts.

    I'll probably go with my Osso Buco recipe, but will need more time to set it out, it's kind of involved. To stimulate curiosity and enthusiasm, I'll include this photo of the highest quality key ingredient.

    Aren't those beautiful? Sorry, NAH.
    I have the same problem with most of my recipes. There are usually the same ingredients in all my dishes, but they don't always have the same amount. I'm a pretty damn good cook although I don't talk about it a lot on here. All my dishes have a very biased "American" tilt to them though which will probably offend Lorenzo's Italian tastes, but, oh, well.


    Cheese Corn

    This is a great dish to make to accompany about any meat you are preparing.

    1 can of southwest style corn
    1 can of mexican corn
    1 can of sweet nibblets corn
    2 cans of combined white (shoepeg) and yellow corn
    2 packages of philadelphia cream cheese
    1 can of original Rotel tomatoes
    2 jars of good quality mushrooms

    Take all ingredients and throw them together into a crock pot. Drain water off rotel, mushrooms and corn before adding. Heat on low heat until cheese is completely melted and blended in with other ingredients. Stir and heat for 30 more minutes and then serve it up. This can be stored in refrigerator and added to any meal throughout the week for a zesty vegetable dish with your choice of meat.


    Oklahoma Spaghetti Sauce


    2 jars of quality store bought spaghetti sauce (your choice of added ingredients, but do not get any sauce with meat added)
    1 package of fresh whole mushrooms
    1 small white onion
    1 can of chopped black olives
    1 pound pork sausage
    1 pound of ground black angus beef
    1 package of pepperonis
    1 small can of tomato paste
    Bay leaves
    Garlic
    Mixed Italian Seasoning
    Cooking wine (or straight wine of your choice)
    Real Parmesan cheese
    A couple or more small cans of tomato sauce

    In a big pot, fry the sausage, beef and onion together until brown. Drain the grease and add the 2 jars of store bought spaghetti sauce. Store bought spaghetti sauce tastes like crap by itself, but it serves as a good foundation sauce for this recipe. Add olives, mushrooms, pepperonis and bay leaves. Cook on high heat for 20 minutes. Now, here is the hard part, you will have to add spices, wine, Parmesan cheese and tomato sauce to taste and to the "consistency" that you want in your sauce. By "consistency" I mean thickness. I like my sauce very THICK, but others prefer a thinner sauce. Add as much tomato sauce as you need to get this consistency, but remember, every time you add sauce, you also need to add spices. It is a "taste" thing, so just fix it according to the taste you prefer. Add spices a little at a time, because you can always add more, but once in, you can't delete them. Once you get everything the way you like it, cook on low heat for an hour or two (low heat in a crock pot is ideal). Taste and add spices as needed.

    I like hearty meat sauces, so Italian food has to be meaty for me. This is why I came up with this sauce that has been a standard around my house for years. I have fixed this on grand scales to feed crowds as big as a 100 people and everyone asked for recipes. It's hard to come up with an EXACT recipe for this, but anyone can take the main ingredients and build a sauce to suit them.

    If you like wimpy thin sauces, then go marry a real Italian.
    Mizuno irons -- made by Hattori Hanzo, forged in the fires of Mt. Fujiyama.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Not a hacker
    Mmmm, raw tasteless flesh, unaccompanied by all the plant based stuff that actually gives it any taste. Makes you want to just run in to a butcher shop and take in the smells. Remind you of an old fuk huh Kiwi? For the edification of others New Zealanders are known in Australia as sheep shaggers.

    P.S. No offense taken Zoe, just some friendly Trans Tasman trash talking.
    That meat sure looks good to me. My favorite is a rib eye steak with peppercorn, big baked potatoe and a nice spinach salad.
    Last edited by famousdavis; 02-24-2011 at 07:58 AM.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by SoonerBS
    I have the same problem with most of my recipes. There are usually the same ingredients in all my dishes, but they don't always have the same amount. I'm a pretty damn good cook although I don't talk about it a lot on here. All my dishes have a very biased "American" tilt to them though which will probably offend Lorenzo's Italian tastes, but, oh, well.


    Cheese Corn

    This is a great dish to make to accompany about any meat you are preparing.

    1 can of southwest style corn
    1 can of mexican corn
    1 can of sweet nibblets corn
    2 cans of combined white (shoepeg) and yellow corn
    2 packages of philadelphia cream cheese
    1 can of original Rotel tomatoes
    2 jars of good quality mushrooms

    Take all ingredients and throw them together into a crock pot. Drain water off rotel, mushrooms and corn before adding. Heat on low heat until cheese is completely melted and blended in with other ingredients. Stir and heat for 30 more minutes and then serve it up. This can be stored in refrigerator and added to any meal throughout the week for a zesty vegetable dish with your choice of meat.


    Oklahoma Spaghetti Sauce


    2 jars of quality store bought spaghetti sauce (your choice of added ingredients, but do not get any sauce with meat added)
    1 package of fresh whole mushrooms
    1 small white onion
    1 can of chopped black olives
    1 pound pork sausage
    1 pound of ground black angus beef
    1 package of pepperonis
    1 small can of tomato paste
    Bay leaves
    Garlic
    Mixed Italian Seasoning
    Cooking wine (or straight wine of your choice)
    Real Parmesan cheese
    A couple or more small cans of tomato sauce

    In a big pot, fry the sausage, beef and onion together until brown. Drain the grease and add the 2 jars of store bought spaghetti sauce. Store bought spaghetti sauce tastes like crap by itself, but it serves as a good foundation sauce for this recipe. Add olives, mushrooms, pepperonis and bay leaves. Cook on high heat for 20 minutes. Now, here is the hard part, you will have to add spices, wine, Parmesan cheese and tomato sauce to taste and to the "consistency" that you want in your sauce. By "consistency" I mean thickness. I like my sauce very THICK, but others prefer a thinner sauce. Add as much tomato sauce as you need to get this consistency, but remember, every time you add sauce, you also need to add spices. It is a "taste" thing, so just fix it according to the taste you prefer. Add spices a little at a time, because you can always add more, but once in, you can't delete them. Once you get everything the way you like it, cook on low heat for an hour or two (low heat in a crock pot is ideal). Taste and add spices as needed.

    I like hearty meat sauces, so Italian food has to be meaty for me. This is why I came up with this sauce that has been a standard around my house for years. I have fixed this on grand scales to feed crowds as big as a 100 people and everyone asked for recipes. It's hard to come up with an EXACT recipe for this, but anyone can take the main ingredients and build a sauce to suit them.

    If you like wimpy thin sauces, then go marry a real Italian.
    What exactly is "Mixed Italian Seasoning." Never mind, I missed the two jars of store bought sauce. If I had seen that I would have stopped reading and dismissed the entire recipe. No offense but making a tomato base sauce from scratch is pretty simple. Each his own. It would be interesting to see what is an OK's understanding of al dente.

  11. #11
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    How can I put this? I will try really, really hard to not be critical in any way of another man's recipe. I'll attack religion, sexuality, choice of golf clubs, clothing, race, nationality and most other things, but not something truly sacred.

    So kudos to you Sooner, it's about what you like, respecting ingredients, enjoying the cooking experience, distributing pleasure to others, exploration, taking risk and amazement that raw ingredients can magically combine into something so phenomenal. It's like most things in life, you can sleepwalk through it, or turn it into a highlight.

    I don't care who you are, you are one meal away from being someone's b.itch if they prepare something you'd like and nail it. And it's the greatest aphrodisiac in the world challenged only by money, charm and appearance.

    We're all constrained by the ingredients we can get where and when we are as well as the time we can devote. I really prefer fresh ingredients, but don't have the access or time they sometimes require. It's more important today than ever because of what goes into processed food and what it can do to you.

    I might cook something with all fresh ingredients that might seem noble to someone in OC while folks back in Italy would be almost horrified. The ingredients back there, with the exception of produce and beef, are generally at another level, but I can't get them daily at a reasonable price.

    The most gifted chefs are capable of taking the best ingredients available on any given day and going from there. Which does give you plenty of options here such as chicken, beef, some forms of veal and to a degree, fish and most produce.

    I salute you Sooner, and TP, for your recipes. I'm sure I would like the sauce. Have you ever tried substituting fresh Roma tomatoes for the canned or jarred sauce? It would be interesting to compare with your normal prep. You might find it fun and rewarding, albeit much more time consuming, or it might not matter to you. Maybe you have. Also, sliced red peppers and mushroom sauteed when done really well, along with the onion, has been known to cause spontaneous orgasm.

    Have you tried meatballing the ground beef? I have no choice, it's an italian law, but it does give you a chance to brown them in a pan first and add a grain meal which with the right seasoning works so well.

    I agree with you completely on consistency and giving it at least an hour or two. The reduction and slight darkening of the sauce from the burn effect is the biggest difference between jarred and home made sauce.

    As far as you last comment, if an italian were to make a wimpy sauce, he/she would be exiled, unless they're just goofing on you. But you should never goof on someone with cooking, it's not at all cool. If you know one that did that please PM me his/her name and address as there's hell to pay.

    A true italian would never do such a thing.
    GR lives...

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by lorenzoinoc
    How can I put this? I will try really, really hard to not be critical in any way of another man's recipe. I'll attack religion, sexuality, choice of golf clubs, clothing, race, nationality and most other things, but not something truly sacred.

    So kudos to you Sooner, it's about what you like, respecting ingredients, enjoying the cooking experience, distributing pleasure to others, exploration, taking risk and amazement that raw ingredients can magically combine into something so phenomenal. It's like most things in life, you can sleepwalk through it, or turn it into a highlight.

    I don't care who you are, you are one meal away from being someone's b.itch if they prepare something you'd like and nail it. And it's the greatest aphrodisiac in the world challenged only by money, charm and appearance.

    We're all constrained by the ingredients we can get where and when we are as well as the time we can devote. I really prefer fresh ingredients, but don't have the access or time they sometimes require. It's more important today than ever because of what goes into processed food and what it can do to you.

    I might cook something with all fresh ingredients that might seem noble to someone in OC while folks back in Italy would be almost horrified. The ingredients back there, with the exception of produce and beef, are generally at another level, but I can't get them daily at a reasonable price.

    The most gifted chefs are capable of taking the best ingredients available on any given day and going from there. Which does give you plenty of options here such as chicken, beef, some forms of veal and to a degree, fish and most produce.

    I salute you Sooner, and TP, for your recipes. I'm sure I would like the sauce. Have you ever tried substituting fresh Roma tomatoes for the canned or jarred sauce? It would be interesting to compare with your normal prep. You might find it fun and rewarding, albeit much more time consuming, or it might not matter to you. Maybe you have. Also, sliced red peppers and mushroom sauteed when done really well, along with the onion, has been known to cause spontaneous orgasm.

    Have you tried meatballing the ground beef? I have no choice, it's an italian law, but it does give you a chance to brown them in a pan first and add a grain meal which with the right seasoning works so well.

    I agree with you completely on consistency and giving it at least an hour or two. The reduction and slight darkening of the sauce from the burn effect is the biggest difference between jarred and home made sauce.

    As far as you last comment, if an italian were to make a wimpy sauce, he/she would be exiled, unless they're just goofing on you. But you should never goof on someone with cooking, it's not at all cool. If you know one that did that please PM me his/her name and address as there's hell to pay.

    A true italian would never do such a thing.
    I am man enough to be corrected where I err, so I immediately retract my statement on wimpy sauces belonging to Italians. Maybe I have eaten at the wrong Italian eateries.

    Where I live I have three choices: go to local Wal Mart (Superstore), local grocery, or drive 100 miles to Oklahoma City to buy ingredients. I use the ingredients I have at hand and try to make great food out of those recipes. I know I could use straight tomato sauce, and I have before, but I can save time by buying the "Ragus and Pregos" as starters. It is a little like using a recipe called for chicken stock or beef stock -- do you cook a chicken or roast to provide your stock, or do you buy a stock from the store, or use one you have already pre-frozen from a time ago? Chicken, beef or vegetable stock is nothing more than a foundation to the recipe you are preparing, so you are not likely going to spend needless hours preparing fresh stock before you even get to the main recipe.

    My spaghetti sauce is damn good for those who like a meat hearty sauce to put on pasta. No recipe should ever be knocked until it has been tried.
    Mizuno irons -- made by Hattori Hanzo, forged in the fires of Mt. Fujiyama.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SoonerBS
    I am man enough to be corrected where I err, so I immediately retract my statement on wimpy sauces belonging to Italians. Maybe I have eaten at the wrong Italian eateries.

    Where I live I have three choices: go to local Wal Mart (Superstore), local grocery, or drive 100 miles to Oklahoma City to buy ingredients. I use the ingredients I have at hand and try to make great food out of those recipes. I know I could use straight tomato sauce, and I have before, but I can save time by buying the "Ragus and Pregos" as starters. It is a little like using a recipe called for chicken stock or beef stock -- do you cook a chicken or roast to provide your stock, or do you buy a stock from the store, or use one you have already pre-frozen from a time ago? Chicken, beef or vegetable stock is nothing more than a foundation to the recipe you are preparing, so you are not likely going to spend needless hours preparing fresh stock before you even get to the main recipe.

    My spaghetti sauce is damn good for those who like a meat hearty sauce to put on pasta. No recipe should ever be knocked until it has been tried.
    As I said, I'm sure I would like the sauce and I salute you for it. Hah, you nailed me on the stock. I admit to guilt over that, particularly given that Yaz is generally able to do his own.

    And I give wide berth on using what's available. We're all constrained in some way, particularly if far from a major city, no less a coast.

    I remember my grandmother talking about cooking during WWII. She was as proud of things she was able to prepare out of basically rations, as anything she'd ever made, and let me tell you, her cooking simply can't be described by words or language. If it smells and tastes heavenly, it's heavenly. Great ingredients simply make it easier and expand the possibilities.
    GR lives...

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    Quote Originally Posted by The Purist
    I'm looking for some new recipes...non-grilling of course (Spank has that section covered).

    I'll give one that the whole family enjoys (including the 2 yr old)

    Mexican Casserole - Chicken

    Ingredients:
    1 1/2 lbs of chicken breast
    Pack of soft tortilla shells (8" or 10")
    1 can of enchilada sauce (15 oz)
    1 can of cream of corn (15 oz)
    1 can of refried beans (15 oz)
    1 can of diced tomatos (15 oz) preferably with green chili peppers
    2 to 4 cups of shredded cheese (chedder or whatever)
    4 ounces of olives

    Directions:
    -Preheat oven 350
    -Boil chicken until cooked thoroughly (15 min or so)...then pull and shred finely with a fork
    -Mix shredded chix, cream of corn, refried beans, tomatoes, olives, and 1/3 or enchilada sauce together in a large bowl (can add some onions, mushrooms, a little chili powder, or whatever else you want)
    -Cover bottom of 13 x 9 dish with 1" strips of tortilla shells, add 1/2 of bowl mixture and lightly cover with cheese, add another layer of 1" tortilla strips, add the rest of bowl mixture, add final layer of tortilla strips, cover top level of strips with rest of enchilada sauce and rest of cheese
    -Cook about 20 to 25 minutes
    Sounds good but why boil a chicken? You lose the flavor and natural fat of the chicken when you boil it. Next time try butchering the chicken into pieces, saute the onions some, add the garlic and finally the chicken. Cook the chicken through and then add some or all of the enchilada sauce to give the chicken some good flavor. Cook for a few minutes and then shred in the pan with a fork. Just a suggestion.

    Flour or corn tortilla's? I'm not a big fan of flour tortilla's and use the corn.

    I have an enchilada casserole recipe but it's New Mexican. No beans or corn but instead it uses Cream of mushrooms and chopped roasted green chilies. We'll add olives to our enchilada's. We'll serve it with a fried egg on top and chopped salad around.

    If I'm industrious I'll make some pinto beans to accompany. Here's my recipe for green chili stewed pinto beans

    2 cups dried pinto beans
    18oz chopped tomatoes
    6-8 roasted green chilies chopped (can if you must but not as good)
    2-4 gloves of garlic
    1 tsp oregano
    1 bay leaf

    rinse beans and add four cups of water in pressure cooker. bring to high pressure and cook for 30 minutes. Drain and rinse beans. Cover with water and return to stove to simmer adding the remaining ingredients. Simmer for about an hour on low heat. Like many dishes, the beans taste better if you let them rest for 24 hours in the refig.

    To me, the best recipe's are like music or art - sometimes less is better. My new favorite quick recipe is a red pepper rubbed pork loin chop with a balsamic vinegar reduction sauce. We usually serve it with sauteed greens, like kale or chard, in anchovy, olive oil, and various ingredients like shitake mushrooms or shallots. The salt in the anchovy balances the sweet balsamic reduction. We'll also have some kind of legume with it like lima beans, green beans, etc. With two of us prepping and cooking it takes less than 15 minutes to prepare. The only reason to not cook a good, healthy meal is the planning involved. It takes time to pick up fresh ingredients.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by lorenzoinoc
    As I said, I'm sure I would like the sauce and I salute you for it. Hah, you nailed me on the stock. I admit to guilt over that, particularly given that Yaz is generally able to do his own.

    And I give wide berth on using what's available. We're all constrained in some way, particularly if far from a major city, no less a coast.

    I remember my grandmother talking about cooking during WWII. She was as proud of things she was able to prepare out of basically rations, as anything she'd ever made, and let me tell you, her cooking simply can't be described by words or language. If it smells and tastes heavenly, it's heavenly. Great ingredients simply make it easier and expand the possibilities.
    Sooner,

    Do they have farmer's market's on your parts? It seems to be a national trend and in our area there is a farmers market almost every weekend. It's worth your time check into it. The more people buy fresh local food from the markets the more pressure to the Walmarts of the world to get fresh local food. Not only does it taste better but it's healthier.

    The main reason I wouldn't start with the ready made sauce is the amount of salt they have. Not to mention the two can's of tomato paste have salt. It's just not healthy and salt is one of those things that the more you have the more your taste buds expect.

    To save time we'll make a large batch of sauce and freeze most of it in quart containers. We use it as a base for all of our tomato base sauces and expand it as needed. We do use Pomi tomatoes carton tomatoes if tomatoes are not in season orbut theirs doesn't have salt added.

    Yes, I make many of our own stocks. The hardest part about making stocks is having the scraps like the chicken carcass. I'm too cheap to sacrifice meat to making stock.

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    Wow, Poe, the rubbed pork loin chop sounds great. Can you provide some more detail? How are you cooking the pork?

    On the enchilada cass, what kind of chiles, Anaheim? Around here even the supermarkets have a bunch of different kinds which provide options. I've been messing around lately with poblanos.

    Planning is the hardest part. You can always just run to the store, but you're much more likely to cook if everything's there. I often do the store run for a new recipe but stock for things I already know. Having everything makes the difference between those 15 minutes and and an hour and a half.
    GR lives...

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    Quote Originally Posted by poe4soul
    Sooner,

    Do they have farmer's market's on your parts? It seems to be a national trend and in our area there is a farmers market almost every weekend. It's worth your time check into it. The more people buy fresh local food from the markets the more pressure to the Walmarts of the world to get fresh local food. Not only does it taste better but it's healthier.

    The main reason I wouldn't start with the ready made sauce is the amount of salt they have. Not to mention the two can's of tomato paste have salt. It's just not healthy and salt is one of those things that the more you have the more your taste buds expect.

    To save time we'll make a large batch of sauce and freeze most of it in quart containers. We use it as a base for all of our tomato base sauces and expand it as needed. We do use Pomi tomatoes carton tomatoes if tomatoes are not in season orbut theirs doesn't have salt added.

    Yes, I make many of our own stocks. The hardest part about making stocks is having the scraps like the chicken carcass. I'm too cheap to sacrifice meat to making stock.
    I can't throw food away either. There is always something you can do with it, but at the risk of having it turn out mediocre. Honestly, for me the greatest reason is fat content. With packaged stock you can get fat free. I've also found that reduced enough, which is usually the case for me, I can season away any difference, other than the fat. There's no denying fat tastes good.
    GR lives...

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    Quote Originally Posted by lorenzoinoc
    Wow, Poe, the rubbed pork loin chop sounds great. Can you provide some more detail? How are you cooking the pork?

    On the enchilada cass, what kind of chiles, Anaheim? Around here even the supermarkets have a bunch of different kinds which provide options. I've been messing around lately with poblanos.

    Planning is the hardest part. You can always just run to the store, but you're much more likely to cook if everything's there. I often do the store run for a new recipe but stock for things I already know. Having everything makes the difference between those 15 minutes and and an hour and a half.
    I'll get the red chili rub ingredients tonight. We also do a fennel dry rub that is good but doesn't use the balsamic reduction sauce. I'll look that up as well. Pork is really an under used meat in the US.
    The balsamic vinegar reduction is simple enough. Usually a cup or so of vinegar, most recipes call for sugar but I'll use maple syrup, pinch of salt. simmer and reduce until it's thick. I'll sometimes add a bit of dijon mustard. The meat is grilled on the stove in a hot Le Creuset grill pan with a heated press. I've tried it on the grill but the smoke flavor actually competed with the rub.

    We get New Mexico green chilies. They are like anaheim but actually have heat. The anaheim are closure to bell peppers in my opinion. Hatch is a popular green chili farm area. Here's a link http://www.hatch-chile.com/product.asp?productid=392347 You can find them in a can but they always have a can flavor which isn't appealing. We get ours in the fall from a local grower grilled. We bag them and freeze them for the rest of the year. It's more expensive to buy local but we don't have to pay for shipping. Ask around you might be surprised. In New Mexico you can find them in the frozen section. I would think that some market in So CA would carry them. They're great in just about anything from eggs to pizza.

    One thing that is lost in modern cooking is the use of the pressure cooker. We've gotten into the pre-processed food here in the US. We picked up a cook book that is written by a NY chief you might like. It's pretty cool 'cause he uses a ton of legumes and whole grains. He uses a pressure cooker in many of the meals. He's vegetarian and these are a collection of recipes he makes for his family. One that is very interesting that you might like is a barley risotto. One cool part about his book is that it is planed meals. So you get a balance flavor meals. The down side is it's vegetarian so you have to extract it to meat dishes. From the sounds of your cooking style you'd like it. It's called Fresh Food Fast: Delicious, Seasonal Vegetarian Meals in Under an Hour.

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    First class, Poe, great info. Look forward to more as you indicated. I'm thinking of trying to re-create maybe all the recipes posted here. Yours are closest to what I generally like, but it might be no less fun getting into the others. In fact I'm tempted to take the ones from TP and Sooner, recreate them, then adapt them to my style and publish that. Not to suggest better, only personalized. Cool, huh?

    I have a Le Creuset in cobalt. That sounds gay but I do. Been grilling kale on it with green onions, vinegar and soy sauce recently. I also have a range hood that could suck my neighbors completely out of their homes and up into the exhaust fan, so I'll take on anything.

    Kitchen equipment brings out the tool time in all of us. Don't get me started on knives, never mind kitchen tools with engines.

    Never thought about getting great chiles and freezing them for periodic use but great thing to do. I'll stuff almost anything, as most around here know, and chiles are no exception, there's alot of great things you can do with them. Lately for me its fish or scallops, a garlic mushroom puree with different variations.

    I've not once used a pressure cooker, which is cool because maybe now I'll buy and mess around with one.
    GR lives...

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    Quote Originally Posted by lorenzoinoc
    I can't throw food away either. There is always something you can do with it, but at the risk of having it turn out mediocre. Honestly, for me the greatest reason is fat content. With packaged stock you can get fat free. I've also found that reduced enough, which is usually the case for me, I can season away any difference, other than the fat. There's no denying fat tastes good.
    Seriously? You just posted a picture of veal shanks. There is more fat in one of those shanks than any homemade stock. Why is it the French are so health? They eat more fat than anyone.

    All I'm going to say is eating some fat is not the evil everyone thinks it is. Your body needs fat just not a ton of it. Kind of like salt. It's the processed crap we eat. It's the fried food. Take out most, if not all of white carb's, and eat greens, lean meat, and legumes and you'll be health. This low fat diet crap has just replaced hart disease with pancreas cancer and other health risks like diabetes (another pancreas disease). While your at it, replace your butter with margarine. That was the food industries recommendation for years. It was wrong and I feel bad for all of those people that ate that trans fat when they could have been eating great tasting butter. Why is it that the generation before us is going to live longer on average than we are? It's not the fat. They ate eggs and bacon every morning. (done with the rant.)

    I honestly don't think these doc's know the answers yet and I think there is too much money directing the studies and research to get clear honest answers. I might be a bit cynical but our diets have more to do with the food industry and their profits than it does with our health.

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    Quote Originally Posted by poe4soul
    Seriously? You just posted a picture of veal shanks. There is more fat in one of those shanks than any homemade stock. Why is it the French are so health? They eat more fat than anyone.

    All I'm going to say is eating some fat is not the evil everyone thinks it is. Your body needs fat just not a ton of it. Kind of like salt. It's the processed crap we eat. It's the fried food. Take out most, if not all of white carb's, and eat greens, lean meat, and legumes and you'll be health. This low fat diet crap has just replaced hart disease with pancreas cancer and other health risks like diabetes (another pancreas disease). While your at it, replace your butter with margarine. That was the food industries recommendation for years. It was wrong and I feel bad for all of those people that ate that trans fat when they could have been eating great tasting butter. Why is it that the generation before us is going to live longer on average than we are? It's not the fat. They ate eggs and bacon every morning. (done with the rant.)

    I honestly don't think these doc's know the answers yet and I think there is too much money directing the studies and research to get clear honest answers. I might be a bit cynical but our diets have more to do with the food industry and their profits than it does with our health.
    I can't disagree with alot of what you're saying. For me it's a matter of allocation. I can't make veal and other things I love without it so when I can reduce it, it's a good thing. I get plenty of it. As far as replacing natural with concocted, each case stands on it's own. The devil detail thing. We don't know why the French are healthy, same applies to northern Italians. It could be the vino, the exercise, but something that hasn't been identified probably plays a major role. It could be short people are healthier.

    If we turn out shorter lived than our predecessors, I'd bet it's the carcinogens they weren't exposed to that we are. And a whole lot of that has to do with processed food.
    GR lives...

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    Quote Originally Posted by lorenzoinoc
    I can't disagree with alot of what you're saying. For me it's a matter of allocation. I can't make veal and other things I love without it so when I can reduce it, it's a good thing. I get plenty of it. As far as replacing natural with concocted, each case stands on it's own. The devil detail thing. We don't know why the French are healthy, same applies to northern Italians. It could be the vino, the exercise, but something that hasn't been identified probably plays a major role. It could be short people are healthier.

    If we turn out shorter lived than our predecessors, I'd bet it's the carcinogens they weren't exposed to that we are. And a whole lot of that has to do with processed food.
    Obviously not much difference between our opinions on this subject. Those Frogs are a mystery but I'm going to guess volume of food has more to do with it then what is in the food.

    I'll look those rub recipes up.

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    Quote Originally Posted by poe4soul
    Obviously not much difference between our opinions on this subject. Those Frogs are a mystery but I'm going to guess volume of food has more to do with it then what is in the food.

    I'll look those rub recipes up.
    We're on the same page. I do try to keep one ear open when I'm around one of the Oncologists in my family. Cool on the recipes.

    Tonight no cooking, it's Thursday, so a date with the fiance. Who knows what that will lead to? Actually I know. Thursday is singles night in OC, everywhere's a meat market, so we keep a close eye on each other on that particular day. I'm kind of in the mood for a perfect steak, but then Japanese doesn't sound all bad.
    GR lives...

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    Quote Originally Posted by lorenzoinoc
    We're on the same page. I do try to keep one ear open when I'm around one of the Oncologists in my family. Cool on the recipes.

    Tonight no cooking, it's Thursday, so a date with the fiance. Who knows what that will lead to? Actually I know. Thursday is singles night in OC, everywhere's a meat market, so we keep a close eye on each other on that particular day. I'm kind of in the mood for a perfect steak, but then Japanese doesn't sound all bad.
    Ancho Chile rub
    2tsp ancho Chile powder
    1/2tsp salt
    1/4tsp dried thyme

    Fennel rub
    2tsp fennel seeds crushed
    1/2 tsp salt
    1/2 tsp ground coriander
    1/2 tsp ground cummin
    1/4 tsp fresh ground black pepper

    The fennel rub pork is recipe suggest the pork should be served with an shallot-onion agrodolce.

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    Quote Originally Posted by poe4soul
    Ancho Chile rub
    2tsp ancho Chile powder
    1/2tsp salt
    1/4tsp dried thyme

    Fennel rub
    2tsp fennel seeds crushed
    1/2 tsp salt
    1/2 tsp ground coriander
    1/2 tsp ground cummin
    1/4 tsp fresh ground black pepper

    The fennel rub pork is recipe suggest the pork should be served with an shallot-onion agrodolce.
    Got it. I'll give them a try.
    GR lives...

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    1 box Kraft Dinner macaroni with cheese sauce mix
    1/4 cup margarine
    1/4 cup whole milk or cream

    -pour about 1 liter of water into pot
    -add 1/4 teaspoon of salt to water
    -add 1/2 teaspoon of margarine to water
    -bring mixture of water/salt/margarine to a boil
    -open box
    -remove sauce mix package
    -empty remaining macaroni noodles into water
    -cook for 7-10 minutes depending on desired consistency of pasta
    -remove pasta from water and place in strainer
    -in empty pot combine 1/4 cup margarine, 1/4 cup whole milk, and contents of sauce mix package
    -heat mixture and stir vigorously to remove powdery lumps, stir until you have a creamy consistency
    -add previously cooked macaroni
    -stir together until a uniform consistency is achieved
    -remove from heat
    -serve and enjoy!

    It sounds pretty tough, I know... but once you've done it a few times it becomes second nature. Stick with it! The results are well worth the effort.



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    Quote Originally Posted by FreakOfNature


    1 box Kraft Dinner macaroni with cheese sauce mix
    1/4 cup margarine
    1/4 cup whole milk or cream

    -pour about 1 liter of water into pot
    -add 1/4 teaspoon of salt to water
    -add 1/2 teaspoon of margarine to water
    -bring mixture of water/salt/margarine to a boil
    -open box
    -remove sauce mix package
    -empty remaining macaroni noodles into water
    -cook for 7-10 minutes depending on desired consistency of pasta
    -remove pasta from water and place in strainer
    -in empty pot combine 1/4 cup margarine, 1/4 cup whole milk, and contents of sauce mix package
    -heat mixture and stir vigorously to remove powdery lumps, stir until you have a creamy consistency
    -add previously cooked macaroni
    -stir together until a uniform consistency is achieved
    -remove from heat
    -serve and enjoy!

    It sounds pretty tough, I know... but once you've done it a few times it becomes second nature. Stick with it! The results are well worth the effort.



    FON
    An absolute staple of mine between the ages of about 5 and 15 or so. When I started cooking for myself I went upmarket to the Alfredo pasta and sauce mix, but can't knock good ol macaroni and cheese (I do a pretty decent vegan version).

    If you want to add a little panache to the dish and make it really something, try pouring the finished product into an oven dish, put some grated cheese on top (I use vegan cheese), then a liberal dash of bread crumbs on top of that(I actually use rice crumbs which come up very crumbly) and stick it on a medium heat for about 10-15 minutes, or until the crumbs go golden. I guarantee it is worth the extra effort from regular old macaroni cheese.
    The views expressed by Not a Hacker are not meant to be understood by you primitive screw heads. Don't take it personally, just sit back and enjoy the writings of your better.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Not a hacker
    An absolute staple of mine between the ages of about 5 and 15 or so. When I started cooking for myself I went upmarket to the Alfredo pasta and sauce mix, but can't knock good ol macaroni and cheese (I do a pretty decent vegan version).

    If you want to add a little panache to the dish and make it really something, try pouring the finished product into an oven dish, put some grated cheese on top (I use vegan cheese), then a liberal dash of bread crumbs on top of that(I actually use rice crumbs which come up very crumbly) and stick it on a medium heat for about 10-15 minutes, or until the crumbs go golden. I guarantee it is worth the extra effort from regular old macaroni cheese.

    Pretty sure it was a staple of most kids' diets at that age. I absolutely loved the stuff. Used to eat a whole box to myself in a single sitting in high school. Alfredo was a step up for sure, but then came Uncle Eddie's favorite - Hamburger Helper. I don't know why they call this stuff hamburger helper. It does just fine by itself, huh? I like it better than tuna helper myself, don't you?

    Your mac & cheese casserole idea is really good, and to add to that you can use crumbled crackers in place of bread crumbs (whatever your favorite cracker happens to be, I think Ritz are an excellent choice), and then shred up a very liberal amount of old cheddar and spread that over the top of the crackers. Top it off with a few squirts of ketchup on top, and even fry up a couple strips of bacon, chop it up and spread it on top as well. Bake it until the cheddar is brown. Good stuff. You have vegan alternatives you could substitute for the bacon and cheese. There is really no limit to how creative you can get with mac & cheese, or casseroles in general.



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  29. #29
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    Lorenzo's Tuscan Chicken Breasts

    This dish is straight out of the countryside north of Rome, adjusted to my preferences. I made it last night to get measurements as I usually do it by feel. With most recipes, I'd recommend getting all ingredients ready in their correct amounts before beginning the cooking, with the exception of those that save no real time.

    For example, if I need 4 tbs of olive oil, I just pour it in based on experience, there's no advantage for me to measure out in advance. If it needs to be more precise, I'll pour it into a measuring spoon and set aside. This is where having small glass bowls or cups are handy. Ingredients get set up in the bowls first.

    However you do it, adding just about any ingredient should never take more than a moment. And when everything's set up in advance, you're free to drink and cook at the same time.

    All of the ingredients here, with exception of Italian parsely, can be gotten at your local Costco. Costco almost always has the best things for the lowest price I can find. The beef there is prime but at choice prices. To get similar quality you must go to a specialty supermarket where you'll get ass-raped. The quality at your average supermarket is pathetic as to most fresh items.

    Ingredients:

    4 boneless, skinless chicken breasts (two Costco packs)
    1 cup chopped red onion
    1/2 cup chopped marinated artichoke hearts
    1/2 cup chopped mushrooms
    3/4 cup chopped marinated sun-dried tomatoes
    4 tbs. olive oil divided in half
    3/4 cup white wine divided in half
    1 tbs. chopped Italian parsely
    1/2 tsp. salt
    1 tsp. fresh ground black pepper
    3 tbs. finely chopped fresh garlic
    4 tbs. butter divided in half
    1/2 cup grated romano

    In large saute pan over medium add half olive oil. Upon first signs of smoke, add onions and cook til translucent.

    Add sd tomatoes, shrooms and artichokes, saute 3-4 mins., add garlic, salt and pepper. Cook 1-2 mins, when garlic shows slight color, deglaze with half of white wine. Scrape off bits real well, add half butter, romano and parsely. When butter melts, remove from heat. This is your stuffing.

    Wash and dry chicken breasts. With sharp knife, slice breasts sideways and open in butterfly fashion. Pound with tenderizer but to no less than 1/4 inch thickness and don't puncture breasts.

    Take 1/4 of stuffing and spread on each breast, mostly on one end. Roll up breast then use toothpicks to keep rolled up breast in place.

    Add remaining oil back into pan, heat on high, add chicken breasts and brown on two or three sides, being careful to keep rolled up. Add remaining butter, deglaze with rest of white wine, reduce to low and cover pan.

    Cook to internal temp of 165 or until done, maybe 8-12 minutes.

    Remove to plates, remove toothpicks, add pan remains on them, sprinkle with romano and a little chopped parsely.

    Accompany with baked, salted and rosemaried finger potatoes and nuked green beans.

    Fantastico!!
    GR lives...

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    I'm being completely honest here but I think the #2 meal at McDonalds tastes better than anything I've ever had. Quarter pounder with cheese, large fries and a big 'ol diet coke. I could eat that every day. I also like the Big Mac meal on occassion. You fancy shmancy guys are riot. Gettin' all feminine with your chicken breasts and olive oil. Cooking's for chicks.

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    Quote Originally Posted by famousdavis
    I'm being completely honest here but I think the #2 meal at McDonalds tastes better than anything I've ever had. Quarter pounder with cheese, large fries and a big 'ol diet coke. I could eat that every day. I also like the Big Mac meal on occassion. You fancy shmancy guys are riot. Gettin' all feminine with your chicken breasts and olive oil. Cooking's for chicks.
    Does your mother still wipe your ass for you, too? FD, your blissful ignorance, while your dominant trait, is not flattering, of which you are ignorant.
    GR lives...

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by lorenzoinoc
    Does your mother still wipe your ass for you, too? FD, your blissful ignorance, while your dominant trait, is not flattering, of which you are ignorant.
    I know. Maybe some day I can be as smart as you portray yourself to be.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by famousdavis
    I know. Maybe some day I can be as smart as you portray yourself to be.
    Looks like somebody got flattened in a Monday meeting or two. It'll pass just don't confuse me with your dog.
    GR lives...

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by lorenzoinoc
    Looks like somebody got flattened in a Monday meeting or two. It'll pass just don't confuse me with your dog.
    Geez, I'm just kidding. I really do think that McDonald's is delicious. In reality, I guess my favorite meal is a rib eye steak, baked potatoe and asparagus with a spinach salad. Of course I do it all on the barbecue because I'm a man. I don't don no apron and I don't scrub no dish.

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by famousdavis
    Geez, I'm just kidding. I really do think that McDonald's is delicious. In reality, I guess my favorite meal is a rib eye steak, baked potatoe and asparagus with a spinach salad. Of course I do it all on the barbecue because I'm a man. I don't don no apron and I don't scrub no dish.
    I thought your favourite would be a rib eye 2 steak.
    I chose the road less traveled.

    Now where the f#ck am I?

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by lorenzoinoc
    This dish is straight out of the countryside north of Rome, adjusted to my preferences. I made it last night to get measurements as I usually do it by feel. With most recipes, I'd recommend getting all ingredients ready in their correct amounts before beginning the cooking, with the exception of those that save no real time.

    For example, if I need 4 tbs of olive oil, I just pour it in based on experience, there's no advantage for me to measure out in advance. If it needs to be more precise, I'll pour it into a measuring spoon and set aside. This is where having small glass bowls or cups are handy. Ingredients get set up in the bowls first.

    However you do it, adding just about any ingredient should never take more than a moment. And when everything's set up in advance, you're free to drink and cook at the same time.

    All of the ingredients here, with exception of Italian parsely, can be gotten at your local Costco. Costco almost always has the best things for the lowest price I can find. The beef there is prime but at choice prices. To get similar quality you must go to a specialty supermarket where you'll get ass-raped. The quality at your average supermarket is pathetic as to most fresh items.

    Ingredients:

    4 boneless, skinless chicken breasts (two Costco packs)
    1 cup chopped red onion
    1/2 cup chopped marinated artichoke hearts
    1/2 cup chopped mushrooms
    3/4 cup chopped marinated sun-dried tomatoes
    4 tbs. olive oil divided in half
    3/4 cup white wine divided in half
    1 tbs. chopped Italian parsely
    1/2 tsp. salt
    1 tsp. fresh ground black pepper
    3 tbs. finely chopped fresh garlic
    4 tbs. butter divided in half
    1/2 cup grated romano

    In large saute pan over medium add half olive oil. Upon first signs of smoke, add onions and cook til translucent.

    Add sd tomatoes, shrooms and artichokes, saute 3-4 mins., add garlic, salt and pepper. Cook 1-2 mins, when garlic shows slight color, deglaze with half of white wine. Scrape off bits real well, add half butter, romano and parsely. When butter melts, remove from heat. This is your stuffing.

    Wash and dry chicken breasts. With sharp knife, slice breasts sideways and open in butterfly fashion. Pound with tenderizer but to no less than 1/4 inch thickness and don't puncture breasts.

    Take 1/4 of stuffing and spread on each breast, mostly on one end. Roll up breast then use toothpicks to keep rolled up breast in place.

    Add remaining oil back into pan, heat on high, add chicken breasts and brown on two or three sides, being careful to keep rolled up. Add remaining butter, deglaze with rest of white wine, reduce to low and cover pan.

    Cook to internal temp of 165 or until done, maybe 8-12 minutes.

    Remove to plates, remove toothpicks, add pan remains on them, sprinkle with romano and a little chopped parsely.

    Accompany with baked, salted and rosemaried finger potatoes and nuked green beans.

    Fantastico!!
    Anything with "Breasts" in the title has to be good.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kiwi Player
    I thought your favourite would be a rib eye 2 steak.
    Only when cooked to black dot with a zz-lite sauce. It's important to make sure the barbecue's grill is square grooved.

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    As far as chicken goes. around here the best ones are farm raised. People who raise them and actually let them run around a chicken coop instead of being raised in cages. The texture and the flavor can not be compared between the two. Last year, I bought 6 whole dressed and packaged chickens that weighed between 8 to ten lbs for 10 a bird. Well worth it. The main problem with most meats bought at the grocers these days is that they are mostly lean. You have to have fat with a piece of meat to give it the proper flavor. Pork is one of the worst offenders. They have bred them to be so lean that the flavor has kind of disappeared. Here some people raise a few cows every year to make a little bit of money and sell a couple. Usually 2, 3, or 4 poeple split a cow and buy a quarter or a half. Hell of a lot cheaper and tastes better. The only thing you have to know is what kind of cow. Holstein, limosine, angus, hereford, etc.
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    Quote Originally Posted by jt1135
    As far as chicken goes. around here the best ones are farm raised. People who raise them and actually let them run around a chicken coop instead of being raised in cages. The texture and the flavor can not be compared between the two. Last year, I bought 6 whole dressed and packaged chickens that weighed between 8 to ten lbs for 10 a bird. Well worth it. The main problem with most meats bought at the grocers these days is that they are mostly lean. You have to have fat with a piece of meat to give it the proper flavor. Pork is one of the worst offenders. They have bred them to be so lean that the flavor has kind of disappeared. Here some people raise a few cows every year to make a little bit of money and sell a couple. Usually 2, 3, or 4 poeple split a cow and buy a quarter or a half. Hell of a lot cheaper and tastes better. The only thing you have to know is what kind of cow. Holstein, limosine, angus, hereford, etc.
    I've heard the limosine cows have the most fat on them, being chauferred around and all. I would never eat a Holstein cow, that guy owes me money.

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by jt1135
    As far as chicken goes. around here the best ones are farm raised. People who raise them and actually let them run around a chicken coop instead of being raised in cages. The texture and the flavor can not be compared between the two. Last year, I bought 6 whole dressed and packaged chickens that weighed between 8 to ten lbs for 10 a bird. Well worth it. The main problem with most meats bought at the grocers these days is that they are mostly lean. You have to have fat with a piece of meat to give it the proper flavor. Pork is one of the worst offenders. They have bred them to be so lean that the flavor has kind of disappeared. Here some people raise a few cows every year to make a little bit of money and sell a couple. Usually 2, 3, or 4 poeple split a cow and buy a quarter or a half. Hell of a lot cheaper and tastes better. The only thing you have to know is what kind of cow. Holstein, limosine, angus, hereford, etc.
    The nice thing about Lorenzo's Tuscan Chicken is while the better the breast the better the final product, it works great with so so breasts and even as leftovers. The fat and moisture are infused. I guarantee if you guys follow the recipe it will be one of the beat things you've ever had.
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    Quote Originally Posted by FreakOfNature
    Pretty sure it was a staple of most kids' diets at that age. I absolutely loved the stuff. Used to eat a whole box to myself in a single sitting in high school. Alfredo was a step up for sure, but then came Uncle Eddie's favorite - Hamburger Helper. I don't know why they call this stuff hamburger helper. It does just fine by itself, huh? I like it better than tuna helper myself, don't you?

    Your mac & cheese casserole idea is really good, and to add to that you can use crumbled crackers in place of bread crumbs (whatever your favorite cracker happens to be, I think Ritz are an excellent choice), and then shred up a very liberal amount of old cheddar and spread that over the top of the crackers. Top it off with a few squirts of ketchup on top, and even fry up a couple strips of bacon, chop it up and spread it on top as well. Bake it until the cheddar is brown. Good stuff. You have vegan alternatives you could substitute for the bacon and cheese. There is really no limit to how creative you can get with mac & cheese, or casseroles in general.



    FON
    What gives FON? We are trying to have a serious conversation comparing recipes for fine food, and these cracker arses start thread jacking with hillbilly food. I haven't tried the crumbled crackers but that sounds like a very good addition. I think the ketchup would be ok if it was spicy, or maybe just regular ketchup with a splash of hot sauce on top. There are quite a few vegan cheeses, and 'not bacon', which is basically a vegan combination of soy meat, grease and salt, exactly like the real thing. Maybe some caramelised onions or shallots could be added, but I don't think you want to fuk too much with a classic. I'm thinking next time we have frineds over for dinner I'm going to blow them away with a GR inspired macaroni cheese masterpiece.
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    Go ahead, laugh it up you uncultured, pathetic morons. The difference between good food and good sex isn't huge and diminishes as you get older.

    Cooking is like religion to me, so in essence, this is my religion thread.
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    Quote Originally Posted by famousdavis
    I'm being completely honest here but I think the #2 meal at McDonalds tastes better than anything I've ever had. Quarter pounder with cheese, large fries and a big 'ol diet coke. I could eat that every day. I also like the Big Mac meal on occassion. You fancy shmancy guys are riot. Gettin' all feminine with your chicken breasts and olive oil. Cooking's for chicks.
    Over 1000 calories and about 70% of your daily fat in that meal. I didn't look at he sodium but I'm sure that's over the top as well. What was your cholesterol numbers again?

    I honestly haven't eaten a fast food hamburger in over 6 months and McD's is way down on the list of fast food I will eat. I've had burgers but if I'm going to clog my arteries it's not going to be with a low quality burgers from chuck out fast food, especially McD's burgers. If you think their burgers are good FD you need to get out more. Step away from the chain establishments and get some food that isn't pre-made, shredded, and has a longer shelf life than a twinky.

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    They just opened up a Five Guys in the area and have to say it ain't too damn bad. Fries just like boardwalk fries with malt vinegar. Yum Yum.
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    Quote Originally Posted by jt1135
    They just opened up a Five Guys in the area and have to say it ain't too damn bad. Fries just like boardwalk fries with malt vinegar. Yum Yum.
    I ate at Five Guys a few months ago. Gigantic Burgers with huge servings of fries. I don't go to McD's very often or really any burger place that often. Actually, I've been eating smaller portions lately and have lost some weight.

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    Quote Originally Posted by lorenzoinoc
    Go ahead, laugh it up you uncultured, pathetic morons. The difference between good food and good sex isn't huge and diminishes as you get older.

    Cooking is like religion to me, so in essence, this is my religion thread.
    Some of us appreciate it Zo. I'm going to print out the recipe for Lorenzo's Tuscan Chicken Breasts and try cooking it sometime this week. Sounds great.
    I chose the road less traveled.

    Now where the f#ck am I?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kiwi Player
    Some of us appreciate it Zo. I'm going to print out the recipe for Lorenzo's Tuscan Chicken Breasts and try cooking it sometime this week. Sounds great.
    Yeah, I'm going to give it a go tomorrow night.
    The views expressed by The Purist do not necessarily represent the views of The Purist. Any posts by the Purist should not be relied upon for truth or accuracy, and should be viewed at your own risk.

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    Quote Originally Posted by poe4soul
    Over 1000 calories and about 70% of your daily fat in that meal. I didn't look at he sodium but I'm sure that's over the top as well. What was your cholesterol numbers again?

    I honestly haven't eaten a fast food hamburger in over 6 months and McD's is way down on the list of fast food I will eat. I've had burgers but if I'm going to clog my arteries it's not going to be with a low quality burgers from chuck out fast food, especially McD's burgers. If you think their burgers are good FD you need to get out more. Step away from the chain establishments and get some food that isn't pre-made, shredded, and has a longer shelf life than a twinky.
    I don't worry about salt and cholesterol in my cooking. That is why the doc gives me meds and right now my BP and Cholesterol is perfect. Besides, you have to die some way so it might as well be eating good food and dying with a massive heart-attack.
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    Quote Originally Posted by famousdavis
    I ate Five Guys a few months ago. Gigantic Burgers with huge servings of fries. I don't go to McD's very often or really any burger place that often. Actually, I've been eating smaller portions lately and have lost some weight.
    To each his own. It's not my thing, but I hear it is popular in California.
    Last edited by SoonerBS; 03-01-2011 at 02:27 PM.
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    Be patient guys, there's a little bit of a learning curve with slicing/pounding the breasts. An alternative is to slice but not pound them. You can also eliminate the mushrooms and increase the other stuffing ingredients if you like. I think you'll be glad you gave it a try.
    GR lives...

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    Quote Originally Posted by lorenzoinoc
    This dish is straight out of the countryside north of Rome, adjusted to my preferences. I made it last night to get measurements as I usually do it by feel. With most recipes, I'd recommend getting all ingredients ready in their correct amounts before beginning the cooking, with the exception of those that save no real time.

    For example, if I need 4 tbs of olive oil, I just pour it in based on experience, there's no advantage for me to measure out in advance. If it needs to be more precise, I'll pour it into a measuring spoon and set aside. This is where having small glass bowls or cups are handy. Ingredients get set up in the bowls first.

    However you do it, adding just about any ingredient should never take more than a moment. And when everything's set up in advance, you're free to drink and cook at the same time.

    All of the ingredients here, with exception of Italian parsely, can be gotten at your local Costco. Costco almost always has the best things for the lowest price I can find. The beef there is prime but at choice prices. To get similar quality you must go to a specialty supermarket where you'll get ass-raped. The quality at your average supermarket is pathetic as to most fresh items.

    Ingredients:

    4 boneless, skinless chicken breasts (two Costco packs)
    1 cup chopped red onion
    1/2 cup chopped marinated artichoke hearts
    1/2 cup chopped mushrooms
    3/4 cup chopped marinated sun-dried tomatoes
    4 tbs. olive oil divided in half
    3/4 cup white wine divided in half
    1 tbs. chopped Italian parsely
    1/2 tsp. salt
    1 tsp. fresh ground black pepper
    3 tbs. finely chopped fresh garlic
    4 tbs. butter divided in half
    1/2 cup grated romano

    In large saute pan over medium add half olive oil. Upon first signs of smoke, add onions and cook til translucent.

    Add sd tomatoes, shrooms and artichokes, saute 3-4 mins., add garlic, salt and pepper. Cook 1-2 mins, when garlic shows slight color, deglaze with half of white wine. Scrape off bits real well, add half butter, romano and parsely. When butter melts, remove from heat. This is your stuffing.

    Wash and dry chicken breasts. With sharp knife, slice breasts sideways and open in butterfly fashion. Pound with tenderizer but to no less than 1/4 inch thickness and don't puncture breasts.

    Take 1/4 of stuffing and spread on each breast, mostly on one end. Roll up breast then use toothpicks to keep rolled up breast in place.

    Add remaining oil back into pan, heat on high, add chicken breasts and brown on two or three sides, being careful to keep rolled up. Add remaining butter, deglaze with rest of white wine, reduce to low and cover pan.

    Cook to internal temp of 165 or until done, maybe 8-12 minutes.

    Remove to plates, remove toothpicks, add pan remains on them, sprinkle with romano and a little chopped parsely.

    Accompany with baked, salted and rosemaried finger potatoes and nuked green beans.

    Fantastico!!
    What type of shrooms? I'm a big fan of cremini for every day cooking but like the white ones for salads and other light meals. I like shiitakes in my scrambled eggs.

    Here's a Mushroom gravy recipe that is outstanding
    5 cups (about) chicken broth (canned low-salt ok if you insist)
    3/4 ounce dried porcini mushrooms
    4 tablespoons (1/2 stick) butter
    2 tablespoons all purpose flour

    1 1/2 cups dry white wine

    1 tablespoon chopped garlic
    1 tablespoon chopped fresh parsley
    2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme
    2 teaspoons chopped fresh rosemary


    Bring 5 cups chicken broth and porcini mushrooms to boil in medium saucepan. Remove from heat; let steep 15 minutes. Transfer mushrooms to work surface; reserve mushroom broth. Chop mushrooms coarsely. Mix 2 tablespoons butter and flour in small bowl to smooth paste. Strain juices from roasting pan into large measuring cup; spoon off fat. Add enough reserved mushroom broth to pan juices to measure 6 cups. Add wine to roasting pan and bring to simmer, scraping up browned bits; add to broth.

    Melt remaining 2 tablespoons butter in large saucepan over medium-high heat. Add garlic and sautÚ 1 minute. Add parsley, thyme, rosemary and mushrooms. SautÚ until mushrooms are tender, about 4 minutes. Stir in broth mixture and simmer until slightly reduced, about 30 minutes. Gradually whisk in butter-flour paste. Boil until reduced to 4 cups, stirring occasionally, about 12 minutes. Season with salt and pepper.

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    Used to like the magic mushrooms back in the 70's and 80's.
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Purist
    Yeah, I'm going to give it a go tomorrow night.
    If nothing else the points scored with SWMBO make it worth trying!

    If it turns out as good as Zo says that's a bonus!
    I chose the road less traveled.

    Now where the f#ck am I?

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    Quote Originally Posted by poe4soul
    What type of shrooms? I'm a big fan of cremini for every day cooking but like the white ones for salads and other light meals. I like shiitakes in my scrambled eggs.

    Here's a Mushroom gravy recipe that is outstanding
    5 cups (about) chicken broth (canned low-salt ok if you insist)
    3/4 ounce dried porcini mushrooms
    4 tablespoons (1/2 stick) butter
    2 tablespoons all purpose flour

    1 1/2 cups dry white wine

    1 tablespoon chopped garlic
    1 tablespoon chopped fresh parsley
    2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme
    2 teaspoons chopped fresh rosemary


    Bring 5 cups chicken broth and porcini mushrooms to boil in medium saucepan. Remove from heat; let steep 15 minutes. Transfer mushrooms to work surface; reserve mushroom broth. Chop mushrooms coarsely. Mix 2 tablespoons butter and flour in small bowl to smooth paste. Strain juices from roasting pan into large measuring cup; spoon off fat. Add enough reserved mushroom broth to pan juices to measure 6 cups. Add wine to roasting pan and bring to simmer, scraping up browned bits; add to broth.

    Melt remaining 2 tablespoons butter in large saucepan over medium-high heat. Add garlic and sautÚ 1 minute. Add parsley, thyme, rosemary and mushrooms. SautÚ until mushrooms are tender, about 4 minutes. Stir in broth mixture and simmer until slightly reduced, about 30 minutes. Gradually whisk in butter-flour paste. Boil until reduced to 4 cups, stirring occasionally, about 12 minutes. Season with salt and pepper.
    The cremini work better than porcini from a texture standpoint IMO as you have the sun dried tomatoes and artichokes so it binds better. The mushroom flavor will get overpowered a little so they're more for texture than anything. I avoid white mushrooms as the only thing they seem to have going for them compared to others is shelf life.

    The gravy recipe sounds great, I look for an opportunity.
    GR lives...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kiwi Player
    If nothing else the points scored with SWMBO make it worth trying!

    If it turns out as good as Zo says that's a bonus!
    It will either get you huge points or make her feel a little bad about her food perhaps not being ambitious enough. Either way you win.
    GR lives...

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    Quote Originally Posted by lorenzoinoc
    The cremini work better than porcini from a texture standpoint IMO as you have the sun dried tomatoes and artichokes so it binds better. The mushroom flavor will get overpowered a little so they're more for texture than anything. I avoid white mushrooms as the only thing they seem to have going for them compared to others is shelf life.

    The gravy recipe sounds great, I look for an opportunity.
    Agree on the cremini and I like the medium or small for the texture reason stated.

    The gravy is great with a simple turkey breast baked with provincial herbs. Don't overdo the turkey seasoning because the gravy is better than any I've had in my life, the seasoning would be lost. Served with the typical turkey veggies like green beans al Dante with butter and light lemon zest or maybe nutmeg if you're dutch and mashed potatoes. Paired with a nice lighter red and you are on your way to a nice mouthgasm.

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    Quote Originally Posted by lorenzoinoc
    It will either get you huge points or make her feel a little bad about her food perhaps not being ambitious enough. Either way you win.
    So I gave it a go tonight. Personally, I thought it was really good. The wife wasn't thrilled with the smell of the Romano...It tastes much better than it smells.

    Are there any similarly textured substitutes for the Romano?
    The views expressed by The Purist do not necessarily represent the views of The Purist. Any posts by the Purist should not be relied upon for truth or accuracy, and should be viewed at your own risk.

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    Quote Originally Posted by The Purist
    So I gave it a go tonight. Personally, I thought it was really good. The wife wasn't thrilled with the smell of the Romano...It tastes much better than it smells.

    Are there any similarly textured substitutes for the Romano?
    You could American down it with grated parmesan. Another mild option would be provelone toasted in the oven and them crumbled. Then again you could make a little extra stuffing throw more parsely in there than the other batch and when you do the baking, top the chicken with it in place of the cheese.

    Glad you tried it. If you like the what the process does to the chicken, there are plenty of substitutions you can make to suit your tastes. And you can play with the oil content along those lines. What kinds of foods does your wife like?
    GR lives...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Not a hacker
    What gives FON? We are trying to have a serious conversation comparing recipes for fine food, and these cracker arses start thread jacking with hillbilly food.
    I was gonna share my epic recipe for beans and wieners, but these unenlightened low-life heathens probably wouldn't even appreciate a quality recipe for punani pie. I'm not sure they're worthy of beans and wieners on toast... it's probably a bit over their heads anyway. It's quite complicated, and there's no shame in screwing it up the first few tries.

    I haven't tried the crumbled crackers but that sounds like a very good addition. I think the ketchup would be ok if it was spicy, or maybe just regular ketchup with a splash of hot sauce on top. There are quite a few vegan cheeses, and 'not bacon', which is basically a vegan combination of soy meat, grease and salt, exactly like the real thing. Maybe some caramelised onions or shallots could be added, but I don't think you want to fuk too much with a classic. I'm thinking next time we have frineds over for dinner I'm going to blow them away with a GR inspired macaroni cheese masterpiece.
    Bullseye BBQ sauce comes in a wide range of flavors and is a great substitute for ketchup if you want to be extra-creative. Vegetable Thins are a great alternative to the Ritz crackers, and there's always Cheez Whiz if you find the KD Casserole to be lacking in "personality". A squirt of premium horse radish mustard helps spice things up nicely as well. We're taking gourmet cooking here... you have to use the good stuff or it will come out all wrong.



    FON
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    Quote Originally Posted by lorenzoinoc
    Go ahead, laugh it up you uncultured, pathetic morons. The difference between good food and good sex isn't huge and diminishes as you get older.
    The difference between good food and good sex is enormous, and in my experience only grows with age. Oh wait, that's something else...

    Cooking is like religion to me, so in essence, this is my religion thread.
    You'd better step it up. This thread is seriously lacking in controversy and offensiveness - two essential qualities of any epic thread.

    The only thing I've found offensive is the inclusion of mushrooms in just about everything. I'm allergic to those things... I get the wonderful explosive #2's every hour for 3 days if I eat them. Which really sucks because they taste pretty good...



    FON
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    Quote Originally Posted by FreakOfNature
    I was gonna share my epic recipe for beans and wieners, but these unenlightened low-life heathens probably wouldn't even appreciate a quality recipe for punani pie. I'm not sure they're worthy of beans and wieners on toast... it's probably a bit over their heads anyway. It's quite complicated, and there's no shame in screwing it up the first few tries.



    Bullseye BBQ sauce comes in a wide range of flavors and is a great substitute for ketchup if you want to be extra-creative. Vegetable Thins are a great alternative to the Ritz crackers, and there's always Cheez Whiz if you find the KD Casserole to be lacking in "personality". A squirt of premium horse radish mustard helps spice things up nicely as well. We're taking gourmet cooking here... you have to use the good stuff or it will come out all wrong.



    FON
    Cheese Wiz. Now you're pulling out the real gourmet big guns. Obviously that's reserved for when you are really out to impress. It's as classy as tomato sauce (ketchup) and nearly as versatile. To hell with all these celebrity chefs that make that fancy stuff that wouldn't feed a sparrow. When it comes to real food, you really know you're shitt FON.
    The views expressed by Not a Hacker are not meant to be understood by you primitive screw heads. Don't take it personally, just sit back and enjoy the writings of your better.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SoonerBS
    Anything with "Breasts" in the title has to be good.
    Sooner... How about Breasts in a picture... I can eat this all day long
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

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    Quote Originally Posted by Not a hacker
    Cheese Wiz. Now you're pulling out the real gourmet big guns. Obviously that's reserved for when you are really out to impress. It's as classy as tomato sauce (ketchup) and nearly as versatile. To hell with all these celebrity chefs that make that fancy stuff that wouldn't feed a sparrow. When it comes to real food, you really know you're shitt FON.
    That's it, the two of you are now banned from this thread. I wouldn't post a picture of a dog taking a crap in a field of soybeans or of tofu. Show some respect. The two of you are more repressed than a nun with vaginal warts when it comes to food.

    FON, as a stoner, you more than anyone should appreciate good food over vomit.
    GR lives...

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    Quote Originally Posted by lorenzoinoc
    That's it, the two of you are now banned from this thread. I wouldn't post a picture of a dog taking a crap in a field of soybeans or of tofu. Show some respect. The two of you are more repressed than a nun with vaginal warts when it comes to food.

    FON, as a stoner, you more than anyone should appreciate good food over vomit.
    Ok Zo, enough cheese wiz. I'll give you guys a Nachos recipe that will blow away your guests, vegan or not. Best thing it's really simple and idiot proof. I like the fact that it get's it taste from simple whole foods and doesn't rely too much on sauces.
    Ingredients (for 2)
    Corn chips
    1 tin refried beans (The right beans are the key to this dish so don't skimp. My personal favourite is Amys organic black beans. Cheap beans can ruin this dish so follow Zo's advice and get good ingredients)
    2-3 tomatos, depending on size (I personally prefer truss tomatos but any good fresh tomatos will do. Make sure they are on the ripe side as you want them to be juicy and full of flavour).
    1/4 lettuce (whatever lettuce takes your fancy, I just go for ice burg lettuce. Makes sure it's fresh and still crunchy, limp lettuce is a let down for any meal).
    1-2 avocados, depending on size (make sure they are on the soft aide as they need to be mashed)
    Hot chilli sauce
    Tomato sauce

    Lay a bed of corn chips on a large oven proof dinner plate. Put liberal amounts of chili and tomato sauce (I find the best ratio is 2 parts chili to 1 part tomato). Spoon the refried beans over th top of the asuce. Use more corn chips to press the beans flat and spread them evenly over the base (try to have most of the surfacecovered with corn chips). Place in medium heat oven. Chop lettuce and tomatoes (tomatoes should be left i decent sized chunks, not too finely choped). Use a fork to mash the avocado into a rough paste. When the corn ships are starting to brown on top remove from the oven. Squirt a dash more tomato cause over top. Spread avacado over the top of that, add lettuce then tomato. Serve with the rest of the corn ship to be used to dip. When eating be sure to get a dollop with all ingredients on it, the combination of flavours together is exquisette.

    P.S. As a stoner, FON would at times have very little appreciation fine food. I've seen stoners eat 24 slice packets of processed cheese without accompaniments after a session when they get the munchies.
    The views expressed by Not a Hacker are not meant to be understood by you primitive screw heads. Don't take it personally, just sit back and enjoy the writings of your better.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Not a hacker
    Ok Zo, enough cheese wiz. I'll give you guys a Nachos recipe that will blow away your guests, vegan or not. Best thing it's really simple and idiot proof. I like the fact that it get's it taste from simple whole foods and doesn't rely too much on sauces.
    Ingredients (for 2)
    Corn chips
    1 tin refried beans (The right beans are the key to this dish so don't skimp. My personal favourite is Amys organic black beans. Cheap beans can ruin this dish so follow Zo's advice and get good ingredients)
    2-3 tomatos, depending on size (I personally prefer truss tomatos but any good fresh tomatos will do. Make sure they are on the ripe side as you want them to be juicy and full of flavour).
    1/4 lettuce (whatever lettuce takes your fancy, I just go for ice burg lettuce. Makes sure it's fresh and still crunchy, limp lettuce is a let down for any meal).
    1-2 avocados, depending on size (make sure they are on the soft aide as they need to be mashed)
    Hot chilli sauce
    Tomato sauce

    Lay a bed of corn chips on a large oven proof dinner plate. Put liberal amounts of chili and tomato sauce (I find the best ratio is 2 parts chili to 1 part tomato). Spoon the refried beans over th top of the asuce. Use more corn chips to press the beans flat and spread them evenly over the base (try to have most of the surfacecovered with corn chips). Place in medium heat oven. Chop lettuce and tomatoes (tomatoes should be left i decent sized chunks, not too finely choped). Use a fork to mash the avocado into a rough paste. When the corn ships are starting to brown on top remove from the oven. Squirt a dash more tomato cause over top. Spread avacado over the top of that, add lettuce then tomato. Serve with the rest of the corn ship to be used to dip. When eating be sure to get a dollop with all ingredients on it, the combination of flavours together is exquisette.

    P.S. As a stoner, FON would at times have very little appreciation fine food. I've seen stoners eat 24 slice packets of processed cheese without accompaniments after a session when they get the munchies.
    Now you're talking. On my list to try.
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    Quote Originally Posted by lorenzoinoc
    Now you're talking. On my list to try.
    I'm enthusiastic and diligent but still a bit of a hack when it comes to cooking. I'm sure you could add some personal touches to it to make it even better, especially presentation wise. I don't pay enough attention to presentation of food. I can guarantee that my nachos taste great, but they probably taste better than they look. I don't mind the messy look, but after watching TV cooking shows I know I my presentation skills are badly lacking.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Not a hacker
    Ok Zo, enough cheese wiz. I'll give you guys a Nachos recipe that will blow away your guests, vegan or not. Best thing it's really simple and idiot proof. I like the fact that it get's it taste from simple whole foods and doesn't rely too much on sauces.
    Ingredients (for 2)
    Corn chips
    1 tin refried beans (The right beans are the key to this dish so don't skimp. My personal favourite is Amys organic black beans. Cheap beans can ruin this dish so follow Zo's advice and get good ingredients)
    2-3 tomatos, depending on size (I personally prefer truss tomatos but any good fresh tomatos will do. Make sure they are on the ripe side as you want them to be juicy and full of flavour).
    1/4 lettuce (whatever lettuce takes your fancy, I just go for ice burg lettuce. Makes sure it's fresh and still crunchy, limp lettuce is a let down for any meal).
    1-2 avocados, depending on size (make sure they are on the soft aide as they need to be mashed)
    Hot chilli sauce
    Tomato sauce

    Lay a bed of corn chips on a large oven proof dinner plate. Put liberal amounts of chili and tomato sauce (I find the best ratio is 2 parts chili to 1 part tomato). Spoon the refried beans over th top of the asuce. Use more corn chips to press the beans flat and spread them evenly over the base (try to have most of the surfacecovered with corn chips). Place in medium heat oven. Chop lettuce and tomatoes (tomatoes should be left i decent sized chunks, not too finely choped). Use a fork to mash the avocado into a rough paste. When the corn ships are starting to brown on top remove from the oven. Squirt a dash more tomato cause over top. Spread avacado over the top of that, add lettuce then tomato. Serve with the rest of the corn ship to be used to dip. When eating be sure to get a dollop with all ingredients on it, the combination of flavours together is exquisette.

    P.S. As a stoner, FON would at times have very little appreciation fine food. I've seen stoners eat 24 slice packets of processed cheese without accompaniments after a session when they get the munchies.
    Sounds pretty good NAH. Who thought we'd be getting Mexican dishes from down under.

    I would probably make the avocado into a light quack by mixing in some lime juice, a touch of salt, a dash of Tabascos, and a finely diced sarrano (sp) pepper with seeds removed.

    Another good touch is green onions.

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    Quote Originally Posted by poe4soul
    Sounds pretty good NAH. Who thought we'd be getting Mexican dishes from down under.

    I would probably make the avocado into a light quack by mixing in some lime juice, a touch of salt, a dash of Tabascos, and a finely diced sarrano (sp) pepper with seeds removed.

    Another good touch is green onions.
    Never had an avocado until I got to California and now I always pick up a bag of them when doing the groceries. The Haas used to have seasons but now, like alot of things that used to, they're available all year. Almost all of the domestic crop is grown in So. Cal.

    A friend of mine is a senior guy at one of the large Avocado growing and distribution companies. As the bulk of the crop begins to ripen, they send employees in the groves with shotguns to sleep overnight as theft is a big problem. The penalty for theft if one's convicted of stealing crops is way more severe than normally handed out for theft of other things.

    You may know the story of how the Haas avo came to be, but for those who don't I'll relay it. Other avo varieties don't compare and are almost never found at the market here anymore. Yet the Haas hasn't been around very long. I would have figured it resulted from clever, painstaking hybridizing but not so. Turns out someone had an avo tree in the backyard of their modest, blue collar east LA home and noticed a strange branch growing in it. They almost pruned it off but instead let it stay.

    The branch was a rare but natural mutation. It produced what we now know as Hass avos and all of them today come from that one branch. Despite great expense and effort, hybridizing's never produced worthwhile avocados.

    I have guacamole a couple of times a week as a meal with chips. When done with this post, we're having it for brunch. There are a zillion recipes but for all of them the key is perfect ripeness followed by chilling. My favorite is the most simple, diced tomatoes toweled to remove seeds and juice, avos, salsa and mucho hot sauce. That's it. Green onions are a nice touch although I usually do guac when short on time so speed is key. It's best as a five minute or less preparation.

    Saw a prep recently on TV where they added sour cream and crumbled blue cheese. One of these days I'll put that out for company and see if anyone eats it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Not a hacker
    I'm enthusiastic and diligent but still a bit of a hack when it comes to cooking. I'm sure you could add some personal touches to it to make it even better, especially presentation wise. I don't pay enough attention to presentation of food. I can guarantee that my nachos taste great, but they probably taste better than they look. I don't mind the messy look, but after watching TV cooking shows I know I my presentation skills are badly lacking.
    Sounds pretty good NAH. I can live without the meat you normally get with nacho's, trouble is it's still missing two vital ingredients. Cheese and sour cream both of which I guess are off limits to vegans.

    Vegetarianism I can live with. Veganism crosses the line into total pain in the ass'ism.
    I chose the road less traveled.

    Now where the f#ck am I?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kiwi Player
    Sounds pretty good NAH. I can live without the meat you normally get with nacho's, trouble is it's still missing two vital ingredients. Cheese and sour cream both of which I guess are off limits to vegans.

    Vegetarianism I can live with. Veganism crosses the line into total pain in the ass'ism.
    I hear what you're saying, but honestly the cheese and sour cream can overpower the dish, and my recipe is worth trying to get the lighter, more subtle flavours that appease a different part of the palat. The avocado still gives it a creamy texture so it's not dry, but without the sour cream and cheese you get a getter appreciation of the lettuce and tomatos. I'm not saying have it my way all the time, but sometimes for something a little different, particularly when you ar3e serving to those with discerning tastes, ditch the cheese and sour cream. If you are making for kids or for a bunch of mates over to watch the footy, my recipe would be wasted. But if you are doing it as an appertizer at a dinner party it would be perfect.

    Poe, I like what you're thinking and will give it a try. My other half likes spicy food like me so it should be a winner.
    Last edited by Not a hacker; 03-06-2011 at 02:30 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by lorenzoinoc
    Never had an avocado until I got to California and now I always pick up a bag of them when doing the groceries. The Haas used to have seasons but now, like alot of things that used to, they're available all year. Almost all of the domestic crop is grown in So. Cal.

    A friend of mine is a senior guy at one of the large Avocado growing and distribution companies. As the bulk of the crop begins to ripen, they send employees in the groves with shotguns to sleep overnight as theft is a big problem. The penalty for theft if one's convicted of stealing crops is way more severe than normally handed out for theft of other things.

    You may know the story of how the Haas avo came to be, but for those who don't I'll relay it. Other avo varieties don't compare and are almost never found at the market here anymore. Yet the Haas hasn't been around very long. I would have figured it resulted from clever, painstaking hybridizing but not so. Turns out someone had an avo tree in the backyard of their modest, blue collar east LA home and noticed a strange branch growing in it. They almost pruned it off but instead let it stay.

    The branch was a rare but natural mutation. It produced what we now know as Hass avos and all of them today come from that one branch. Despite great expense and effort, hybridizing's never produced worthwhile avocados.

    I have guacamole a couple of times a week as a meal with chips. When done with this post, we're having it for brunch. There are a zillion recipes but for all of them the key is perfect ripeness followed by chilling. My favorite is the most simple, diced tomatoes toweled to remove seeds and juice, avos, salsa and mucho hot sauce. That's it. Green onions are a nice touch although I usually do guac when short on time so speed is key. It's best as a five minute or less preparation.

    Saw a prep recently on TV where they added sour cream and crumbled blue cheese. One of these days I'll put that out for company and see if anyone eats it.
    I would put Avos right up on my list of must have foods. As a vegan you don't get as many foods with fats in it, so the avo is used all the time. As well as nachos, it is absolutely the number 1 ingredient in slads, and I also use it on burgers and salad rolls.
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    Quote Originally Posted by famousdavis
    I ate at Five Guys a few months ago. Gigantic Burgers with huge servings of fries. I don't go to McD's very often or really any burger place that often. Actually, I've been eating smaller portions lately and have lost some weight.
    Five Guys has got some awesome burgers and fries but I still don't think it tops In and Out burger. It's the best we have on the east coast. I heard they're opening 7 chains in Texas. I don't know whether to be jealous or pissed off.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mward2002
    Five Guys has got some awesome burgers and fries but I still don't think it tops In and Out burger. It's the best we have on the east coast. I heard they're opening 7 chains in Texas. I don't know whether to be jealous or pissed off.
    There's a place near me called Savannah's in Dana Point that has the best hamburger I've ever had. They grind up some sort of fancy meat and put ridiculously good bacon and cheeses on it. It's $10-12, can't remember. While on the one hand that's expensive for a burger, it's gotta be well over 1/2 a pound and is the cheapest thing on the menu at what is a pretty fancy restaurant.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mward2002
    Five Guys has got some awesome burgers and fries but I still don't think it tops In and Out burger. It's the best we have on the east coast. I heard they're opening 7 chains in Texas. I don't know whether to be jealous or pissed off.
    I love both, but I like 5 guys more because of the free/tons of free toppings. Jalepenos, grilled onions etc. Totally rules.

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    I used to do a legume soup but it required assumbling a mix of beans and legumes from at a specialty supermarket. Not long ago, Costco started carrying a legume mix which is excellent.

    I did a soup today from a recipe that came with the beans and it's magnifico. Really inexpensive, filling and pretty healthy, particularly if you use lowfat chicken sausages.

    Gourmet Bean Soup

    • 2 tablespoons olive oil
    • 1 pound Ital. Sausage sliced into 1-inch pieces
    • 1 larged onion, diced
    • 1 green bell pepper, diced
    • 1 red bell pepper, diced
    • 4 garlic cloves, minced
    • 1 14-ounce can diced tomatoes
    • 1 8-ounce can tomato sauce
    • 1/4 teaspoon red chili flakes
    • 2 bay leaves
    • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
    • 1 pound Costco Gourmet Bean Blend
    • 12 cups chicken stock
    • salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
    • freshly grated Parmesan cheese for serving, if desired

    Heat the olive oil in a large stock pot set over high heat. Add the onion and sausage and saut╚, stirring often until the sausage is browned. Add the garlic and peppers and saut╚ for 2 minutes. Stir in the diced tomatoes, tomato sauce, red chili flakes, bay leaves, pepper, Gourmet Bean Blend and chicken stock. Bring to a boil over high heat, skimming off the foam that rises to the top. Reduce heat and simmer, stirring occasionally for 3.5 hours or until beans are tender and soup has thickened. Taste and adjust seasoning with salt and pepper. Makes about 4 quarts. Serve with grated Parmesan cheese, if desired. * to shorten cooking time, pre-soak the beans if desired: place beans in a pot and cover with several inches of water. Bring to a boil over high heat, then remove from heat and let soak for 1 hour. Drain beans and proceed with recipe.
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    Quote Originally Posted by lorenzoinoc View Post
    I used to do a legume soup but it required assumbling a mix of beans and legumes from at a specialty supermarket. Not long ago, Costco started carrying a legume mix which is excellent.

    I did a soup today from a recipe that came with the beans and it's magnifico. Really inexpensive, filling and pretty healthy, particularly if you use lowfat chicken sausages.

    Gourmet Bean Soup

    • 2 tablespoons olive oil
    • 1 pound Ital. Sausage sliced into 1-inch pieces
    • 1 larged onion, diced
    • 1 green bell pepper, diced
    • 1 red bell pepper, diced
    • 4 garlic cloves, minced
    • 1 14-ounce can diced tomatoes
    • 1 8-ounce can tomato sauce
    • 1/4 teaspoon red chili flakes
    • 2 bay leaves
    • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
    • 1 pound Costco Gourmet Bean Blend
    • 12 cups chicken stock
    • salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
    • freshly grated Parmesan cheese for serving, if desired

    Heat the olive oil in a large stock pot set over high heat. Add the onion and sausage and saut╚, stirring often until the sausage is browned. Add the garlic and peppers and saut╚ for 2 minutes. Stir in the diced tomatoes, tomato sauce, red chili flakes, bay leaves, pepper, Gourmet Bean Blend and chicken stock. Bring to a boil over high heat, skimming off the foam that rises to the top. Reduce heat and simmer, stirring occasionally for 3.5 hours or until beans are tender and soup has thickened. Taste and adjust seasoning with salt and pepper. Makes about 4 quarts. Serve with grated Parmesan cheese, if desired. * to shorten cooking time, pre-soak the beans if desired: place beans in a pot and cover with several inches of water. Bring to a boil over high heat, then remove from heat and let soak for 1 hour. Drain beans and proceed with recipe.
    I like the sound of this. I cn replace the sausage for soy sausage, and I would have to ditch the garlic as I'm allergic, but the rest sounds good (fake parmesan is easy to find and Massel vegan 'chicken' stock is awesome) . It's winter down here, and a ****ing cold winter at that for Oz, so soups are definitely on the menu.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Not a hacker View Post
    I like the sound of this. I cn replace the sausage for soy sausage, and I would have to ditch the garlic as I'm allergic, but the rest sounds good (fake parmesan is easy to find and Massel vegan 'chicken' stock is awesome) . It's winter down here, and a ****ing cold winter at that for Oz, so soups are definitely on the menu.
    Those substitutions ought to work. Didn't realize winters in Sydney could get cold. This soup ought to stick to your ribs.
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    Quote Originally Posted by lorenzoinoc View Post
    Those substitutions ought to work. Didn't realize winters in Sydney could get cold. This soup ought to stick to your ribs.
    ... and that keep your body steady for a good golf swing... BTW, winter is Sidney is 50F at the lowest, what the hell are you complaining about....

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    Quote Originally Posted by lorenzoinoc View Post
    Those substitutions ought to work. Didn't realize winters in Sydney could get cold. This soup ought to stick to your ribs.
    They aren't supposed to, but yesterday we had a max temp of 12 Celsius. If this keepsup I might have to wear a vest to golf.
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    Poe, have you tried smoking trout or a similar fish in the green egg? I'd like to be able to do that and wonder if the green egg could serve as a smoker.

    Seared trout has been working well, but smoked would create some interesting possibilities.
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    Quote Originally Posted by lorenzoinoc View Post
    Poe, have you tried smoking trout or a similar fish in the green egg? I'd like to be able to do that and wonder if the green egg could serve as a smoker.

    Seared trout has been working well, but smoked would create some interesting possibilities.
    I haven't. Only because there is a smoke house just down the street that cold smokes trout and steelhead. The steelhead is awesome but my wife is a big fan of trout. We alternate; neither of us are a big fan of smoked salmon. I like it but not as much as steelhead or trout. Maybe this next weekend I'll try to make some smoked trout and eggs for breakfast on the green egg. That sounds good. Maybe with some uncured beacon inside. What type of smoke do you suggest? Just be sure it goes with raw oysters on the halfshells. The farmers markets sells suspended singles by the dozen for abou t a buck an oyster.

    If you ever get a chance, try smoked steelhead. Phuck, now I'm hungry....

    BTW - Portland is actually starting to get some cool restaurants that are making their own cured meats. They are also getting local grocery stores to carry it. Now if we could just do better than cheddar cheese....

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    Quote Originally Posted by poe4soul View Post
    I haven't. Only because there is a smoke house just down the street that cold smokes trout and steelhead. The steelhead is awesome but my wife is a big fan of trout. We alternate; neither of us are a big fan of smoked salmon. I like it but not as much as steelhead or trout. Maybe this next weekend I'll try to make some smoked trout and eggs for breakfast on the green egg. That sounds good. Maybe with some uncured beacon inside. What type of smoke do you suggest? Just be sure it goes with raw oysters on the halfshells. The farmers markets sells suspended singles by the dozen for abou t a buck an oyster.

    If you ever get a chance, try smoked steelhead. Phuck, now I'm hungry....

    BTW - Portland is actually starting to get some cool restaurants that are making their own cured meats. They are also getting local grocery stores to carry it. Now if we could just do better than cheddar cheese....
    I never had any trouble finding really good restaurants downtown. I'd start at the Heathman and work my way down to the seafood place just down Broadway. I also remember some good spots on I think it was 23d. I do remember it seemed to get funky away from downtown.

    I don't have experience smoking fish, but around here Alder seems to be popular. If you can get Cherry or Maple up there they might be worth a try. I wouldn't use Mesquite for fish.

    Surprised that specialty cheeses are hard to find there. Cheese is no small part of my diet.
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    Quote Originally Posted by lorenzoinoc View Post
    I never had any trouble finding really good restaurants downtown. I'd start at the Heathman and work my way down to the seafood place just down Broadway. I also remember some good spots on I think it was 23d. I do remember it seemed to get funky away from downtown.

    I don't have experience smoking fish, but around here Alder seems to be popular. If you can get Cherry or Maple up there they might be worth a try. I wouldn't use Mesquite for fish.

    Surprised that specialty cheeses are hard to find there. Cheese is no small part of my diet.
    You can find specialty cheeses, they are just imported. There are some around that do sheep's, goat milk. They just aren't as good as some of the imported cheeses.

    Has it been a while since you were in town? There were two fish houses near broadway. One was couch street fish house. It was outstanding but closed. The other is one was jakes. It's become a McCormick & Schmick's restaurant. They have since sold out and become a notional chain - chuck out food. FD would like this place.

    I guess what I'm pointing out is there are places that are taking on the artistry of cooking and not just ordering food, making dishes and chucking food out. Like this place. It's a butcher and a steakhouse. they always have interesting items on their menu and the cuts our outstanding. http://www.laurelhurstmarket.com

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    Quote Originally Posted by poe4soul View Post
    You can find specialty cheeses, they are just imported. There are some around that do sheep's, goat milk. They just aren't as good as some of the imported cheeses.

    Has it been a while since you were in town? There were two fish houses near broadway. One was couch street fish house. It was outstanding but closed. The other is one was jakes. It's become a McCormick & Schmick's restaurant. They have since sold out and become a notional chain - chuck out food. FD would like this place.

    I guess what I'm pointing out is there are places that are taking on the artistry of cooking and not just ordering food, making dishes and chucking food out. Like this place. It's a butcher and a steakhouse. they always have interesting items on their menu and the cuts our outstanding. http://www.laurelhurstmarket.com
    Yeah, I've been in a couple of times but it's probably been 5 years or so since I crawled around. Got you on the cheese. It seems that kind of stuff's taken a pretty good hit everywhere during the downturn.

    The kind of restaurant you describe is hard to find here too. Most have been sold as well but there are some that survive and now that I think about it, they're the places that are still packing them in while many of the chain type upscale places have boarded up.
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    Quote Originally Posted by lorenzoinoc View Post
    Yeah, I've been in a couple of times but it's probably been 5 years or so since I crawled around. Got you on the cheese. It seems that kind of stuff's taken a pretty good hit everywhere during the downturn.

    The kind of restaurant you describe is hard to find here too. Most have been sold as well but there are some that survive and now that I think about it, they're the places that are still packing them in while many of the chain type upscale places have boarded up.
    Lorenzoinoc: try this, I did it last weekend... easy to do and taste good, you just have to adjust the "saltiness" to your liking
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1YcQiJ1MPTg

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pky6471 View Post
    Lorenzoinoc: try this, I did it last weekend... easy to do and taste good, you just have to adjust the "saltiness" to your liking
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1YcQiJ1MPTg

    I've made a couple of Moroccan dishes recently, this one looks pretty good. I've thought about putting up some preserved lemons and now I'm going to do it. There's no getting away from the saltiness though with that ingredient.

    I like Moroccan spicy so I'd probably add some ground chili, maybe chipotle or cayenne and tumeric. In fact I'm surprised they left the tumeric out.
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    Quote Originally Posted by lorenzoinoc View Post
    I've made a couple of Moroccan dishes recently, this one looks pretty good. I've thought about putting up some preserved lemons and now I'm going to do it. There's no getting away from the saltiness though with that ingredient.

    I like Moroccan spicy so I'd probably add some ground chili, maybe chipotle or cayenne and tumeric. In fact I'm surprised they left the tumeric out.
    Don't they also use paprika? I'm always confused with paprika. My wife has at least 3 different paprika's. The one I usually go for is the smokey paprika. Probably similar effect to a chipotle.

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    Quote Originally Posted by poe4soul View Post
    Don't they also use paprika? I'm always confused with paprika. My wife has at least 3 different paprika's. The one I usually go for is the smokey paprika. Probably similar effect to a chipotle.
    The basics for Moroccan are white pepper, salt, ginger and tumeric. Cumin, saffron, paprika and cinnamon are also typical while these days nouveau Moroccan usually includes hot chiles as a heat source.

    I've got a few different kinds of paprika but can't tell any differences although I've never had a paprika that approaches chipotle in heat. But I'll usually combine the two. Which is what I'd do as to Pkwy's recipe.
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    Quote Originally Posted by lorenzoinoc View Post
    The basics for Moroccan are white pepper, salt, ginger and tumeric. Cumin, saffron, paprika and cinnamon are also typical while these days nouveau Moroccan usually includes hot chiles as a heat source.

    I've got a few different kinds of paprika but can't tell any differences although I've never had a paprika that approaches chipotle in heat. But I'll usually combine the two. Which is what I'd do as to Pkwy's recipe.
    I was referring to the smokey, earthy flavor not the heat.

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    Quote Originally Posted by poe4soul View Post
    I was referring to the smokey, earthy flavor not the heat.
    I've been dumping chipotle in alot of dishes lately. I'd love to see them do that spice on Iron Chef.
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    Quote Originally Posted by lorenzoinoc View Post
    I've been dumping chipotle in alot of dishes lately. I'd love to see them do that spice on Iron Chef.
    I like chipotle but stay away from it in most prepared, read chuck out restaurants, because the food tastes like Liquid Smoke was added.

  92. #92
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    Oral Sex Chicken with Rimjob Rice:

    In a rice cooker, 4 cups quality brown basmati rice, follow instructions

    Saute in olive oil 1-2 red bell peppers, 2 yellow onions and 6-12 ounces of mushrooms all coarsely chopped; Salt, freshly ground pepper and just before done, 4-8 cloves of finely chopped garlic.

    Add above to rice in cooker along with 3 tablespoons Butter or Margarine, Chipotle pepper, dried Basil, finely chopped fresh Rosemary, Salt and freshly ground Black Pepper, all to taste.

    Oral Sex Chicken:

    Combine as a marinade Olive oil, Worcestershire, White Vinegar, Red Wine, Lemon Juice (oil one third to half of above ingredients, others to taste) Cayenne Pepper, Granulated Garlic, chopped Rosemary, Paprika, Salt, Pepper and 5-10 Spice Cloves to taste but plenty of the garlic and salt. Make enough to cover chicken in a bowl or large ziploc bag(s).

    Marinade 2-4 lbs of skinless, boneless chicken thighs 3-24 hours, Bake in remains of marinade 30-40 minutes at 425, turning once.

    Serve the Oral Sex Chicken on top of the Rimjob Rice and enjoy.

    The leftovers will stay good about as long as anything you'd save.

    This is an easy, forgiving recipe you can screw around with (make substitutions and change amounts) and get great results.

    Hopa you like.
    Last edited by lorenzoinoc; 11-07-2011 at 04:09 AM.
    GR lives...

  93. #93
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    Well, I've been drafted to do Thanksgiving. Picture a collection of about 16 people without families nearby who want Thanksgiving Giovanni style. Ordered a fresh, organic turkey from Whole Foods. I'm toying with the idea of getting a deep fryer for outside but then the house won't gain the same aroma.

    Turkey's kind of s.hitty without strong sauce so I'm going to spike the gravy with tomato paste and a fine chop of sun dried tomatoes.

    With the turkey and gravy covered, I need sides. I'm thinking candied yams, sage stuffing and a kind of slaw. Maybe a killer mac & cheese.

    Guests are bringing wine (Barolos - that's the deal) and dessert. Should be interesting, traditional American food isn't my forte.
    GR lives...

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