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  1. #1
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    From the range to the course

    Im having trouble moving my game from the range to the course. Im 15 and I've only been playing seriously for 5 months and have improved a ton. Took some lessons and now have nice swing. At the range I can hit about 95 percent of my shots nicely with good trajectory but at the course I hit more mess ups (tops, shanks...) and when i do hit it alright i have an extremely low trajectory making it hard to place on the green. Can anyone help find why I suck.

  2. #2
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    First off you don't suck Ac...

    Quote Originally Posted by Ac3^
    Im having trouble moving my game from the range to the course. Im 15 and I've only been playing seriously for 5 months and have improved a ton. Took some lessons and now have nice swing. At the range I can hit about 95 percent of my shots nicely with good trajectory but at the course I hit more mess ups (tops, shanks...) and when i do hit it alright i have an extremely low trajectory making it hard to place on the green. Can anyone help find why I suck.
    you have a problem just about all players experience. Even the pros at one time or another. The nice thing about a range is there is no negative outcome for a bad shot. The bad thing about the range is there is no negative outcome for a bad shot. On the course the result is a higher score than you'd like. So one way to help bring that good swing to the course is to put as much pressure on yourself on the range as you'd experience on the course. Some do it by playing each range shot as though it were on the course by giving themselves a target and going through the same routine as they would on the course. Another option is to put no pressure on yourself just like on the range. To do that you have to convince yourself that the outcome(good or bad) won't adversely effect your life in the larger scheme of things. In both you still go through your routine and have a swing that is repeating. You must also honestly rate yourself on how well you hit your shots, their direction and distance. Fooling yourself always shows up on the course. Next you must have patience. Without it your emotions will rule your swing and your muscle control will suffer. Develop a repeating swing on the range. Then bring the swing and the mental attitude you had on the range to the first tee. Lastly realize that bad shots are part of the game and minimizing their effect on your score is sometimes all you can control. That said if your feel is off that day then try to keep it between the trees even if it means sacrificing distance. Hope this helps even a small bit. Luck.
    Last edited by fred3; 01-23-2006 at 05:49 PM.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Ac3^
    Can anyone help find why I suck.
    Probably bad genes.

  4. #4
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    Spoken like someone...

    Quote Originally Posted by Lloyd_Christmas3
    Probably bad genes.
    who has first hand experience with that problem, but is unable to actually see it in others. We call it the mirror syndrome. That's where all the negative we think we see in others is actually what we dislike most about ourselves.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by fred3
    who has first hand experience with that problem, but is unable to actually see it in others. We call it the mirror syndrome. That's where all the negative we think we see in others is actually what we dislike most about ourselves.
    Play on, fred.

  6. #6
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    Ahhh. The Troll....

    Quote Originally Posted by Lloyd_Christmas3
    Play on, fred.
    a well known creature of little intelligence who inputs their verbal sewage on a website to increase their own sense of worth while at the same time making sure they post nothing of relevant value. Their age has nothing to do with their experience, but their experience has everything to do the age they act.

    I leave you now to converse with yourself Mrs. 3.

  7. #7
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    Thanks for the advise lloyd. I know its mental but I think there is something wrong with my swing also. O well i have a lesson on thursday so ill ask him.

  8. #8
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    You simply must learn to take your game to the course, many of us have that problem. Sounds like you need to play a little more than practice at the moment.
    Cheers,
    Jay

  9. #9
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    I had this problem when switching drivers the two times I have done such. My only recommendations would be to maybe play a round later in the day or when there is no one behind you and treat it as nothing more than a practice round. Play a couple balls, or at least a second shot after every bad one. Try different clubs and different techniques just so you begin to feel loose on the course. The other option is talk to an instructor about taking a playing lesson, it is offered at most courses. The added pressure of having the pro watching and instructing may allow you to duplicate some of the mistakes that you make on the course, and get positive feedback on how to correct the situation.

    Good Luck!!!

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by fred3
    who has first hand experience with that problem, but is unable to actually see it in others. We call it the mirror syndrome. That's where all the negative we think we see in others is actually what we dislike most about ourselves.
    You've have called me naive and immature. Hmm... you could have mirror syndrome, but you haven't accused me of going through a mid-life crisis yet, so I think your diagnosis is still up in the air.
    "You got a choice. You can stop, or you can start."
    "Start?
    "Walkin"
    "Where?"
    "Right back to where you always been... and then stand there... Still... real still... And remember... "

  11. #11
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    You don't suck, kid. You're just learning. You're taking lessons, I'd advise you try to soak them up as well as you can. It takes practice, and unlike video games, heck even with video games, you never know how to do it perfectly right away. You'll be lucky if you ever learn how to play golf 'perfectly' in your lifetime. Even if you live to be 90 and play every week.

    Try to focus on enjoying the game, and don't complain about not being any good. Remember how fortunate you are that your parents pay for you to be able to play, or even hit the practice range... Not to get all UNICEF on you, but really - don't complain about not being any good. Play the game to enjoy it, period.

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by 19handicap
    yeah play the game and enjoy it like you do pissing teenagers off! idiot
    Play on, 19.

  13. #13
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    lol thx guys guess i just gotta get more experience. Only have 2 weeks till tryouts so i need to pick it up.

    Try to focus on enjoying the game, and don't complain about not being any good. Remember how fortunate you are that your parents pay for you to be able to play, or even hit the practice range... Not to get all UNICEF on you, but really - don't complain about not being any good. Play the game to enjoy it, period.
    haha yea Im pretty lucky to have parents who have enough money to buy me nice clubs and lessons.

  14. #14
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    One word you should think about every now and again when on the course..

    RELAX

    When on the driving range all the difference is that your relaxed, when on the course all your thinking about is hit it on the fairway, do this, do that. Don't think about that, simply align your self with your target, relax and swing, simple as that.

  15. #15
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    This is fairly common.

    You basically need to get off the range, and on to the course more.

    and when on the course, play away, but try to not hit hard and loosen up your grip on every shot, especially during the first three or four holes, which will condition you for the rest as you get warmer and feel more confident.

    the range is good practice, bt does not replace play. too much range is not good for you ( and not very fun either).

    before playing, I NEVER go to the range. I hit a few chips around the practice green and a few putts. this loosens me up before playing - if I go the range, it generally generates tension, stress and pressure.... personal opinion based on my opinion.....

    other than that, fred has provided some valuable thoughts in his first post too.

    and by the way - 95% of your shots straight and good on the range are rarely that good, it's just that our perception is good too ( looser targets, less distracting elements for alignment.....

  16. #16
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    Seriously, the problem of going from a good range session to a poor course performance is all "north of the ears". I'm guilty of this myself, from time to time. As some of the previous posts have mentioned, it's all about confidence. If you are confident over the shot, you are more likely to take a nice, relaxed swing and produce a good shot. If you lack confidence, you're more likely to tighten up the forarms or wrists and produce a blocked shot, or rush the shot and hit it thin, fat, or a pull hook. Eventually, it's "mind over matter". You have to convince your subconscious and conscious thoughts that you have a good probability of hitting the shot well, and if you miss, so what? Hitting into a bunker or other hazard is disappointing, but not a disaster in the big sense. When faced with a challenging on course shot, I try to visualize a much easier shot, either on the range or on an easier hole.
    It's said that when a professional looks at a shot, they first look at the trouble to avoid, then look at the target and imagine their shot going well. Many amateurs (and I'm guilty of this, too) first look at the target, then spend their emotional effort thinking about the hazards. You want your last thoughts before hitting to be positive thoughts which will help you relax and hit a smooth swing. Does doing this work all the time? Of course not, but try to think positively and make sure your last thoughts are NOT negative, but positive thoughts before you take your swing.
    Assuming you are not a scratch or near scratch golfer, there is no shame in laying up short of the green and going on with a wedge vs. "going for it" and risking a real blow up hole if there is severe trouble right around a hole. An extra stroke on the layup shot and then making an easy single bogey on a really tough hole is better than always shooting for the pin and ending up with a double or triple bogey on a really difficult hole. Also, if the approach to a green is feasable, but the pin is tucked in a really difficult spot with trouble all around the pin, shoot for the middle of the green and try for a longer two putt, rather than going after a "sucker pin." These things are just course management. Balancing risk vs. rewards will help improve your score, and increase your confidence to handle difficult situations. The more confident you are, the better you'll swing and you'll end up in a "positive feedback loop" instead of things going from bad to worse. Good luck.
    Seldom right, never in doubt......

  17. #17
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    I was thinking part of my problem had to do with hitting off grass instead of a mat. Has anyone had a problem like this because thats is what I thought was making me do bad.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ac3^
    I was thinking part of my problem had to do with hitting off grass instead of a mat. Has anyone had a problem like this because thats is what I thought was making me do bad.
    If you are hitting off synthetic mats on the range, they can give one a false sense of security. They don't sufficiently punish "fat" shots; the club just sort of slides on through and you get a reasonable result......on the range. A fat shot on a real course will punish you. Mats also encourage people to sweep the ball instead of hitting down on it with the irons. Plus, they are harder on elbows and wrists. They also can gradually throw off the lie angles and/or lofts on softer forged clubs. Other than that, they're great. On the other hand, if that is your only option, they are your only option......
    Seldom right, never in doubt......

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ac3^
    Im having trouble moving my game from the range to the course. Im 15 and I've only been playing seriously for 5 months and have improved a ton. Took some lessons and now have nice swing. At the range I can hit about 95 percent of my shots nicely with good trajectory but at the course I hit more mess ups (tops, shanks...) and when i do hit it alright i have an extremely low trajectory making it hard to place on the green. Can anyone help find why I suck.

    If youi've just started playing one of the hardest things, at least for me, was getting comfortable on the golf course. I started playing in the late summer of 2004. It really wasn't until I played about 10 rounds on courses that I started feeling comfortable on a golf course. Also remember to slow down and take your time (Just don't be Ben Crane slow ). Often on the course you can feel more pressure because it counts and people are watching. That can make some folks nervous, which can lead to speeding up your tempo and throw off your swing.

  20. #20
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    Yea I know im having trouble relaxing but Ive played a bunch of rounds and have only had one shot that I truly had a good shot.(8 iron 130 yards nice high trajectory landed couple feet from the hole). Im guessing my problem is what dorkman said about the difference of a mat and grass.

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